On the 6th June, the Conservative parliamentary party held a vote on the future of the prime minister. Some 211 Conservative MPs voted to have confidence in Boris Johnson, with 148 Conservative MPs voting for the prime minister to go.

In a secret ballot it is impossible to know exactly which Conservative MPs lack confidence in the prime minister.

Based largely on their public statements, we have broken Conservative MPs into the following groups in terms of how they may have voted.

  1. 1. Known opponent of the prime minister. (57 Conservative MPs)
  2. 2. Possible rebel (67 Conservative MPs)
  3. 3. Unknown and unclear (47 Conservative MPs)
  4. 4. Probable supporter of the prime minister (30 Conservative MPs)
  5. 5. Supporter of the prime minister. (158 Conservative MPs)

1. Known opponent of the prime minister (57 MPs)

Aldous, Peter (Known Opponent)
Suffolk MP. Confirmed he has sent in a letter calling for a leadership contest, tweeting that it was clear that Boris Johnson had ‘no intention’ of resigning voluntarily.

Baron, John (Known Opponent)
Independently minded MP from Essex, who opposed the Gulf War in 2003. Issued a statement on the day after the publication of the Gray report saying that the prime minister no longer enjoyed his support. Mr Baron said, “To knowingly mislead it can not be tolerated, no matter the issue. Whether or not the Prime Minister is an asset to the party or the country is of less importance”.

Baker, Steve (Known Opponent)
Serial rebel and Brexiter who was heavily involved in the campaign to oust Theresa May.  Backed Boris in 2019, but never entered the Johnson government.  Would comfortably lose his Wycombe seat to Labour in an election based on anything like the current opinion polls.  Previously described the prime minister’s current position as one of ‘checkmate. In the Commons debate on Partygate on 21st April he declared, “The prime minister now should be long gone. The prime minister should just know the gig’s up”.

Bell, Aaron (Known Opponent)
Red Wall MP from Newcastle under Lyme who criticized the prime minister in the Commons, and who confirmed he has submitted a letter of no confidence. 

Bowie, Andrew (Known Opponent)
Scottish MP for West Aberdeen and Kincardine who was once PPS to Theresa May.  Backed Boris Johnson in the eventual 2019 leadership election and was a Conservative party vice chair until 2021. In January 2022 said, “I think the prime minister should be considering his position”. His marginal Aberdeen West seat would be comfortably lost to the SNP on the basis of current polling.  Tweeted to confirm that he had voted against the PM in the no confidence vote.

Bradley, Karen (Known Opponent)
Cabinet minister under Theresa May, but dismissed by Boris Johnson as soon as he became PM in 2019. Following the issuing of fixed penalty notices to the PM and Chancellor she told ‘Staffordshire Live’ that she would herself resigned if she had broken the rules that she had passed.

Bridgen, Andrew (Known Opponent)
Outspoken Brexiteer from North West Leicestershire.  Previously put in a letter of no confidence in Theresa May, and has confirmed to have done so on Boris Johnson.  Has claimed there is now a ‘moral vacuum’ at the heart of government.

Brine, Steve (Known Opponent)
Remainer from whom Johnson removed the Conservative whip back in 2019. Previously described the Sue Gray findings as an ’embarrassment’.  In May 2022, confirmed he had sent a letter of no confidence in the prime minister. He would easily lose his Winchester seat to the Liberal Democrats based on current polling.

Clifton-Brown, Geoffrey (Known Opponent)
Tory grandee who is treasurer of the 1922 committee. Regarded as something of a long standing critic of Boris. Was quoted in December as saying that unless the PM’s performance improved, “some members of the party will be thinking we have got to have a change”.  Media reports have also suggested there are links between the so called ‘pork pie’ plot of Tory MPs elected in 2019 and a shooting event held by the APPG on Shooting and Conservation, itself chaired by Sir Geoffrey. Speaking on the ‘Today’ programme after the Gray report he reiterated his view that he did not support an 8 week leadership campaign at the current time.  Nonetheless after the vote, he detailed how he had voted against the prime minister.

Colburn, Elliot (Known Opponent)
Young MP from south west London who was elected in 2019.  After the publication of the Gray Report he confirmed that he had sent in a letter of no confidence some time ago, and reiterated that the report had proven that he was ‘not wrong’ to do so. He would comfortably lose his Carshalton and Wallington seat to the Lib Dems in any election that reflected the current opinion polls.

Davis, David (Known Opponent)
Veteran Conservative MP and former cabinet minister.  Called on Boris Johnson to “in the name of God, go”, in the House of Commons in January.

Davies, Philip (Known Opponent)
Outspoken MP on the right of the Conservative party who is married to fellow MP, Esther McVey. He backed Boris Johnson in the 2019 leadership election.  He would comfortably lose his Shipley seat in West Yorkshire to Labour in any general election based on current opinion polling levels. He has been quoted in his local Telegraph and Argus telling a constituent that, “It was completely unacceptable for the PM to have broken the lockdown laws that he imposed on the rest of us – laws I opposed throughout – and it is unjustifiable”.  Confirmed on the day of the no confidence vote that he has submitted a letter of no confidence in the PM.

Davison, Dehenna (Known Opponent)
Young Conservative MP from Durham with a very large social media following.  She gained Bishop Auckland by a big majority for the Conservatives in 2019, but would now lose her seat to Labour. Reported as saying she was “incredibly angry” about the Downing Street parties and the prime minister’s response. Named in the media as a potential ring leader in the so called ‘pork pie plot’ of MPs from the 2019 intake, who are believed to be hostile to Boris remaining in No.10. Confirmed she had voted to remove the PM in the no confidence vote.

Dunne, Philip (Known Opponent)
Former defence minister under David Cameron and Theresa May who is the MP for Ludlow in Shropshire.  He was instrumental in managing Jeremy Hunt’s campaign for the Conservative party leadership against Boris Johnson back in 2019.   After the publication of the Gray report, Mr Dunne said that Mr Johnson had ‘lost the benefit of the doubt’.  Further agitated the day after the no confidence vote.

Ellwood, Tobias (Known Opponent)
Former defence minister and current chair of the defence select committee who is not shy to criticize the government,   Described the row over parties as “horrible to defend”, and has confirmed that he has sent a letter to the 1922 committee.  Was directly critical of the PM to his face in the Commons on the day of the publication of the Gray report.  In significant danger of losing his once safe Bournemouth East seat to Labour in any general election that reflected the current opinion polls.

Gale, Sir Roger (Known Opponent)
Veteran MP representing the towns of Herne Bay and Margate on the Kent coast.  He is a particularly long-standing critic of Boris Johnson. Has suggested the PM has misled the House of Commons. He was previously amongst the first to submit a letter of no confidence in the prime minister, and told BBC Radio 4, that the PM is a “dead man walking”.

Garnier, Mark (Known Opponent)
Backed Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election. Writing in a weekly column, described the Gray Report as “not good reading. He was prepared to tell BBC Midlands Live that: “we are on a bit of a glide slope to Johnson’s departure”. After the police issued a fine to the PM, he expressed concern that further fines would follow. He was quoted as saying ,”I didn’t support Boris Johnson in the leadership elections – I was worried about character flaws and I haven’t been disappointed”.

Ghani, Nusrat (Known Opponent)
Former transport minister who was sacked from the government in 2020. Suggesting her Islamic faith was an issue for her dismissal, she then became embroiled in a public dispute with the former chief whip over the related circumstances. She supported Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election. Early in 2022 the Daily Mail suggested that Ghani was ‘known’ to have already submitted a letter of no confidence.

Gibb, Nick (Known Opponent)
Former long standing junior education minister from Bognor Regis. He was removed from the government by Boris Johnson in 2021. Confirmed he had sent a letter to the 1922 committee. He had previously written in the Telegraph that: “We need to face up to hard truths. To restore trust, we need to change the prime minister”.

Green, Damian (Known Opponent)
Former deputy prime minister and ally of Theresa May, who was himself forced to step down after an investigation by the said Sue Gray.  On the One Nation wing of the party, not necessarily a Johnson bed fellow. In late April 2022, Mr Green told Kent Online that he strongly denied media reports that he was a ring leader of any campaign to remove Mr Johnson.  On the day of the vote, he did though confirm that he had voted against the PM in the no confidence vote.

Hammond, Stephen (Known Opponent)
Conservative MP for Wimbledon in south west London with an ultra slim majority.  Confirmed that he had sent in a letter of no confidence in Boris Johnson the day after the Gray Report was published. Arch ‘remainer’ who lost the Conservative whip after rebelling against the Johnson government on Brexit in 2019.

Harper, Mark (Known Opponent)
Former government chief whip, and one time leadership opponent to Boris Johnson in 2019.  Retains political ambitions. Very critical of the Johnson government for the levels of its Covid restrictions. After the PM was issued with a police fine, he told the Commons that Boris Johnson is “no longer worthy of the great office that he holds.” He then issued a Tweet containing the text of his letter of no confidence.

Hoare, Simon (Known Opponent)
Dorset MP, and member of the Tory Reform Group on the left of the Conservative party.  Described how he has had over 1,400 emails around partygate. Told the Bournemouth Echo that: “I am very concerned about what it’s doing to the status of parliament and to the status of government not just at home but abroad as well”. Continuing he said: “These are very serious things and I think there’s a hell of a lot of damage that is going on and I’m very depressed and very worried about it all”.  Currently on the warpath with the government over the Northern Irelend protocol.

Holmes, Paul (Known Opponent)
Elected in 2019 for Eastleigh in Hampshire.  He resigned as PPS to Priti Patel two days after the publication of the Gray report. In statement he said, “It is clear to me that a deep mistrust in both the Government and the Conservative Party has been created by these events, something that pains me personally”.

Hudson, Neil (Known Opponent)
Equine vet who was elected in 2019 for the safe seat of Penrith and the Border. Has been publicly critical in relation to the partygate affair saying he was “appalled” at the reports of the May gatherings in Downing Street.  He has also commented that he will not defend the indefensible and that there should be ‘serious consequences’ if the rules have been broken.  Had called for a leadership election post the international Ukraine.

Hunt, Jeremy (Known Opponent)
Former foreign secretary who was defeated by Johnson in the 2019 Conservative leadership election. He is chair of the commons health select committee. On the BBC in May refused to say if he believed the PM was honest. Instead he commented in January, that his own leadership ambitions have not completely vanished. On the day of the no confidence vote, said he will vote against the PM. On current polling would lose his seat to the Lib Dems in any general election.

Jones, Andrew (Known Opponent)
A junior minister under Theresa May, but lost his job when Boris Johnson became prime minister. Remainer who backed Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 leadership election. His Harrogate constituency would see a knife edge battle with the Lib Dems at current opinion poll levels. Said that correspondence with the 1922 is ‘confidential’, but that ‘nobody should doubt’ his unhappiness. Was reported as having said he would vote against the PM on the day of the no confidence vote.

Kearns, Alicia (Known Opponent)
First elected for Rutland and Melton in 2019. Ambitious MP who has been reported in the media as being the ring leader behind the so called ‘pork pie plot’ (named in relation to her constituency) of MPs elected in 2019 who are hostile to the PM.  After the Gray report, she put out a statement on Facebook which said, “I can only conclude that the Prime Minister’s account of events to Parliament was misleading’. Continuing, “My position remains unchanged since January and the prime minister continues not to hold my confidence”.

Lamont, John (Known Opponent)
MP for Berwickshire, Roxburgh and Selkirk who would be in danger of losing his seat to SNP if an election was held based on current polling.  He backed Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 Conservative leadership election. Has been critical of the garden party event in May 2020, describing it as ‘unacceptable’. Quoted in his local Border Telegraph as saying, “No one is above the law. Not even the Prime minister”. Resigned as a ministerial aide on the day of the no confidence vote and said it was time for a change.

Leadsom, Andrea (Known Opponent)
Former cabinet minister who left the cabinet in 2020.  Brexiter who heavily disrupted Boris Johnson’s  ‘non starting’ leadership bid in 2016 by declaring her own candidacy. Describes herself as a proud christian.  In a letter to constituents released after the Gray Report, Leadsom wrote, “The conclusion I have drawn from the Sue Gray report is that there have been unacceptable failings of leadership that cannot be tolerated and are the responsibility of the prime minister.”

Lewis, Julian (Known Opponent)
Extremely independent minded MP from the New Forest who lost the Conservative whip for many months earlier in this parliament when standing to become chair of the Commons intelligence and security committee on the back of Labour votes. After the Gray Report was published, Mr Lewis told his local Daily Echo paper that, “This indefensible behaviour at the heart of government was utterly unnecessary.” Referring to the prime minister he said, “Everybody who took part, of whom he was one, must carefully consider what to do next”.  Revealed he voted against the PM.

Liddell-Grainger, Ian (Known Opponent)
Veteran MP from Somerset who is a descendent of Queen Victoria.  Backed Boris in the 2019 leadership election. Has told his local Somerset County Gazette that the Downing Street parties were an ‘absolute breach of trust’ and ‘utterly indefensible’.

Loughton, Tim (Known Opponent)
Former junior minister who backed Boris in the 2019 leadership election. However, he now claims to be “very angry” and has submitted a letter to the 1922 committee. Has described his thinking as not relating to how many sausage rolls or glasses of Prosecco the prime minister had, but “the way that he has handled the mounting revelations in the last few weeks”. Would comfortably lose his increasingly more marginal East Worthing and Shoreham seat to Labour in a general election held on the basis of current opinion polls.

Mangnall, Anthony (Known Opponent)
Devon MP and former researcher to William Hague who confirmed that he had sent a letter to the 1922 committee soon after the Gray report was published.  Argues that the PM’s “actions and mistruths” are overshadowing the extraordinary work of so many excellent ministers and colleagues”.

Mills, Nigel (Known Opponent)
Brexiteer who represents Amber Valley in Derbyshire.  Following the news that the prime minister and chancellor had received fines, Mills became the first fresh Conservative MP to publicly claim Johnson’s leadership should not survive. He told BBC Radio Derby that: “In all conscience I don’t think a prime minister can survive or should survive breaking the rules he put in place”, adding, “We have to have higher standards than that of people at the top. He has been fined, I don’t think his position is tenable”.

Mitchell, Andrew (Known Opponent)
Former cabinet minister who once resigned over his own ‘plebgate’ affair in Downing Street. Told the prime minister in the House of Commons chamber that he no longer enjoys his support.

Moore, Robbie (Known Opponent)
Elected in 2019, gaining his Keighly seat from Labour with a majority of 2,218. He would comfortably lose that seat to Labour if an election was held on the back of current opinion poll levels. He has also said publicly that he is in infuriated by the ‘partygate’ allegations, and that, “If any event took place that was in breach of the rules, the strongest disciplinary action must be taken, and I will continue to follow any revelations on this closely.” Quoted in his local ‘On the Spot News’ he expressed his ‘total disapproval’ of the gatherings in Downing Street, and said, “I worry whether this can be resolved”. Explained to his local Keighley News why he voted against Boris.

Morris, Anne Marie (Known Opponent)
First elected as the Conservative MP for Newton Abbot in Devon back in 2010.   She was a Brexiter who once submitted a letter of no confidence in Theresa May.  In early 2022, she was one of the first to have confirmed that she had done the same to Boris Johnson. Earlier in 2022, she voted for a Labour motion calling for a VAT cut on energy bills which led to her being stripped of the Conservative whip.  The whip was restored in May 2022, and only a few weeks later she announced she had resubmitted her letter of no confidence.

Mundell, David (Known Opponent)
Former secretary of state for Scotland who backed Michael Gove in the 2019 leadership election.  His Dumfries, Clydesdale and Tweedale seat would be comfortably lost to the SNP on the basis of current polling. His son Oliver is a Member of the Scottish Parliament. On the day of the no confidence vote, Mundell tweeted to call for fresh leadership for the country.

Neill, Bob (Known Opponent)
Independently minded MP from south east London who backed Michael Gove in the 2019 conservative leadership election.  In a statement on his website released after the Gray report, Mr Neill said, “Trust is the most important commodity in politics, but these events have undermined trust in not just the office of the Prime Minister, but in the political process itself. To rebuild that trust and move on, a change in leadership is required”.

Nokes, Caroline (Known Opponent)
Remainer from Hampshire who temporarily lost the Conservative whip back in 2019 over Brexit. She is chair of the women and equalities select committee. She also recently made allegations against the prime minister’s father. Confirmed that she submitted a letter to the 1922 committee, arguing that it is up to the party to decide whether Boris Johnson goes now or at a general election in three years time.

Norman, Jesse (Known Opponent)
Left the government in 2021.  School friend of Boris Johnson.  Served as an advisor to Boris during his time as London mayor.  On the day that the no confidence vote was announced, he released a lengthy letter calling for the PM to go. On BBC Radio 4 he described claims that the prime minister had been vindicated over the Gray report as grotesque, and said there were 3 or 4 other candidates who could do a much better job than Boris Johnson.

Penrose, John (Known Opponent)
The MP for Weston-super-Mare. Married to Baroness Dido Harding who once ran the government’s track and trace programme.  Backed Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 leadership election. Resigned as the PM’s anti corruption tsar on the day of the no confidence vote and then openly called for the prime minster to go.

Poulter, Daniel (Known Opponent)
Suffolk MP and psychiatrist.  Quoted in the Guardian as saying, of the PM’s apology that it was not much consolation to “those of us” who cared for patients on the frontline of the NHS. Said that, should the PM have been found to have actively misled parliament, or if he faces criminal sanctions, then his position would be untenable.

Pawsey, Mark (Known Opponent)
Represents Rugby in the Commons, a seat once held by his father.  Supported Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 Conservative leadership election.  Recently rebelled on the Covid pass issue. Came out calling for a change of PM on the day of the no confidence vote.

Richardson, Angela (Known Opponent)
Would comfortably lose her Guildford seat to the Lib Dems based on the current levels of Conservative polling.  The first resignation from the government’s so called ‘payroll vote’ because of ‘partygate’.  Quitting her position as PPS to Michael Gove, she cited her ‘deep disappointment’ in Boris Johnson.  On the day of the no confidence vote, said she will be voting against the PM.

Robertson, Laurence (Known Opponent)
Veteran Tewkesbury MP who was unable to visit his dying father in hospital due to Covid rules.  In an email sent to constituents that was published on Gloucestershire Live he has referenced how the May Downing Street gathering was held five days after his father’s funeral. Declared that he had voted against the PM on the day of the no confidence vote.

Ross, Douglas (Known Opponent)
Leader of the Scottish Conservatives who publicly called for Johnson to resign on the back of the PM admitting that he attended the Downing Street gathering in May 2020. Claimed the PM’s position is “no longer tenable”, and confirmed that he has sent a letter of no confidence. Initially rowed back from this position at the start of the Ukraine war, but later confirmed he had voted against Mr Johnson in the ‘no confidence’ vote.

Stevenson, John (Known Opponent)
Supported Michael Gove in the 2019 leadership election.  Would lose his Carlisle seat to Labour in a general election based on the current levels of opinion polls.  Detailed how he had submitted a letter of no confidence in the week after the publication of the Gray report.

Streeter, Gary (Known Opponent)
Veteran MP from Devon. Evangelical Christian who sits on the left of the Conservative party. Has written a letter to the 1922 committee saying he couldn’t “reconcile” the pain and sacrifice of the vast majority of the British public during lockdown with the attitude and activities of those working in Downing Street.

Simmonds, David (Known Opponent)
Elected in 2019 for a neighbouring constituency to the PM in north west London.  They day after the publication of the Gray Report he told the Times newspaper that, “It is clear that while the government and our policies enjoy the confidence of the public the prime minister does not”, adding, “Accordingly, it is time for him to step down”.

Sturdy, Julian (Known Opponent)
Supported Boris Johnson in the 2019 leadership election. Straight talking Yorkshireman who has said claims that the Downing Street garden party was a work related event won’t wash with the public.  He issued a statement on the publication of the Gray report saying, “I am now unable to give the prime minister the benefit of the doubt”.

Syms, Robert (Known Opponent)
Long standing MP from Dorset.  Covid lockdown sceptic who backed Boris in the 2019 leadership election. Early in 2022 he said ,“I am considering whether or not I ought to put in a letter. I’ve had emails from what I would call Christian, decent, honest, honourable types of Tory voters, who say they feel embarrassed about voting Conservative with Boris Johnson’. After the Gray report, he told the Bournemouth Echo that the PM was using up his ‘nine lives’. On the day of the no confidence vote, confirmed he was opposing the prime minister.

Thomas, Derek (Known Opponent)
Brexiter who supported Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 leadership contest.  Under current opinion polling levels would lose his St Ives seat to the Liberal Democrats. Before the Gray report was published commented on Facebook, that, “If the inquiry or the Metropolitan police find that the alleged activities were illegal and that the PM knew this, or was involved, then I think he should consider his position.” Referencing his upbringing he told Cornwall Live about the importance of the theme of being ‘beyond reproach’…. He submitted a letter of no confidence back in April.

Tugendhat, Tom (Known Opponent)
Foreign affairs select committee chair and the MP for Tonbridge in Kent.   Remainer, whose uncle was a European Commissioner.  After the Gray report he commented, “it is very difficult to have any confidence in the government”. Described by the Independent newspaper as a fierce critic of the PM, someone with whom he is thought to have a prickly relationship. Politically very ambitious.  Became the first MP to openly declare himself as a candidate to replace Mr Johnson.

Whittaker, Craig (Known Opponent)
Conservative MP for Calder Valley, elected in 2010, but would comfortably lose his seat if a general election was held on the back of current opinion poll numbers. The day after the police issued fines to both Boris Johnson and Rishi Sunak, he told a Facebook “Q and A” that he thought the pair should both do the ‘right thing’ and resign. On 20th April, he told Sky News that, “I want the Prime Minister to take responsibility for his actions”.

Wragg, William (Known Opponent)
Chair of the Commons public administration select committee and an MP from the north west of England. Has complained about the tactics used by government whips. Would lose his Hazel Grove seat to the Lib Dems in any election based on current opinion poll numbers. Confirmed that he has submitted a letter of no confidence in the PM.

Wright, Jeremy (Known Opponent)
Former Attorney General. In the week after the Gray Report was published he released a long statement on his website that called on the prime minister to resign. Mr Wright was previously quoted in the Guardian as suggesting the PM should face “resignation or removal from office” if he was found to have knowingly attended rule-breaking parties.

2. Possible rebels (67)

In search for the remaining MPs who are likely to have voted against the prime minister in the No Confidence vote, we consider the following to the most likely potential candiates:

Aiken, Nickie (Possible rebel)
London MP appointed by Johnson as a vice chair of the Conservative party in 2020.  After the Conservatives lost Westminster Council the May Elections, her parliamentary seat would appear in danger in a general election. Said she was ‘”incredulous and appalled” over partygate.

Anderson, Lee (Possible rebel)
Red Wall MP from Nottinghamshire.  Former miner and Labour councillor, who only joined the Conservatives in 2018. He indicated to his local Chad media that he did vote for the PM.  However he previously wrote on Facebook that: “Personally, I would not back anyone who has knowingly done wrong”. In an interview with Andrew Neill suggested that the Conservatives could lose some 5 million red wall voters.  Said that he will submit a letter of no-confidence if Boris “lost the trust of the nation”.

Ansell, Caroline (Possible rebel)
Eastbourne MP who would lose her seat to the Liberal Democrats based on current polling. Previously resigned as a government PPS over the government’s response to the free school meals campaign led by Marcus Rashford.  Evangelical christian. On partygate, told the Eastbourne Herald that, “I am just as concerned as anyone to know what has happened and why”.

Atkins, Victoria (Possible rebel)
Home office minister appointed by Boris Johnson.  Like other ministers is not able to declare that she may have voted against the PM, and indeed claims to have voted for him and so this has to be noted. However her father was once a Conservative MP and then MEP. He is a close personal friend of former PM, and arch Johnson critic, John Major. She is also one minister who has previously been relatively quiet in terms of making supportive noises of the prime minister.

Baillie, Siobhan (Possible rebel)
First elected in 2019 but would lose her Stroud seat heavily in any election held under current polling backdrop.  In April she described the lockdown fines as ‘serious’. She was quoted in the Stroud News as saying, “I will now listen to my constituents about these latest developments and speak to my parliamentary colleagues after recess.”

Baker, Duncan (Possible rebel)
Former UKIP member elected for North Norfolk in 2019. Echoed Diane Abbott’s question in the House of Commons when asking Johnson about the Gray report. In April, Mr Baker suggested that he would have potentially broken with Tory whips and supported an inquiry into whether the PM lied to Parliament.  He refused to tell his local Eastern Daily Press how he voted, potentially as he may have had to resign as a PPS if had done so?

Baldwin, Harriet (Possible rebel)
The MP for West Worcestershire. A former minister who was sacked by Boris Johnson as soon as he became PM in 2019. Supported Jeremy Hunt rather than Johnson in the 2019 leadership election.  Told Bloomberg, that if the official report finds that the prime minister has lied to parliament, then that was a “red line” for her.  Ahead of the vote she refused to say she was supporting the PM, but told Worcester News she was taking soundings from local people.

Beresford, Sir Paul (Possible rebel)
Dentist and veteran MP from Surrey who backed Boris Johnson in the 2019 leadership contest.  Has been quoted in the Guardian as saying, “As we await the full report on events, and in all likelihood for the foreseeable futureI and many of my parliamentary colleagues will regard the prime minister as being ‘on licence’. He has behaved foolishly and is undeniably a diminished figure now”. Beresford was once the leader of Wandsworth Council, which the Consrevatives lost in the May 2022 local elections.  Did not confirm to Surrey Live how he voted.

Blackman, Bob (Possible rebel)
Former Member of the London Assembly who would narrowly lose his Harrow East seat to Labour in any election that reflected current opinion poll levels. Blackman was one of the first MPs to be openly critical after the ‘partygate’ allegations emerged, saying: ‘People are rightly furious… I am clear that those who set the rules must abide by them or face the consequences’.

Bottomley, Sir Peter (Possible rebel)
Longest serving MP, who has historfically been very independently minded.  Reportedly refused to offer the prime minister his upport. Has sat on the outside left of the Conservative party for most of his time in parliament.  Backed Jeremy Hunt rather than Boris Johnson in the 2019 contest. 

Buckland, Robert (Possible rebel)
Supported Boris Johnson in the 2019 contest, and sat as a cabinet minister between 2019 and 2021. He has since been dismissed by Boris. Prior to becoming an MP, he served as a judge sitting on the Midlands circuit. He is positioned on the left of the Conservative party. Would comfortably lose his Swindon South seat to Labour based on current opinion polling. Has asked Boris a number of pointed questions in the Commons on partygate. He issued a tweet which appeared critical of the vote of no confidence on the day of the vote, but also didn’t go as far as actually confirming he had voted for the PM.

Cartlidge, James (Possible rebel)
Elected in 2015.  Junior justice minister. Backed Jeremy Hunt in 2019. After the issuing of the police fixed penalty notice, he issued a statement on his website that talked about both ‘sides of the ledger’, and contains the words ‘as challenging as circumstances may be’. Outwardly the statement appears to be backing the PM, particularly in the context of the war in Ukraine, but you might also be forgiven, for wondering about the extent to which the comments have been carefully crafted. It is certainly more nuanced than we have seen from many other government ministers. Suggested he was backing the PM on Twitter on the day of no confidence vote, but again the wording didn’t appear quite as punchy or explicit as others.  

Caulfield, Maria (Possible rebel)
Junior health minister who has worked as a nurse at the Royal Marsden.  She would comfortably lose her Lewes seat in Sussex to the Lib Dems in any election based on current opinion polling. After the issuing of lock down rules said on Twitter that the PM and Chancellor needed to get on with their jobs, but alsefo reaffirmed that she was critical of events in Downing Street. An earlier statement on her website had said, “I spoke out publicly when Dominic Cummings broke the rules during lockdown and called for his resignation and so I will be calling for action against anyone who has been found to have broken the rules. It is clear that there was a culture inside Number 10 where even if rules were not technically broken, the spirit of the rules were, and this is completely unacceptable”.  Unlike other ministers, did not reveal how she voted or issue a statement to say she supported the PM.

Chalk, Alex (Possible rebel)
Solicitor General on the left of the Conservative party.  Supported Matt Hancock in the 2019 leadership election.   He would comfortably lose his Cheltenham seat to the Lib Dems in any election based on current polling. Chalk was reported as being concerned about Johnson’s comments in relation to Jimmy Saville and according to the Guardian was previously said to be on ‘resignation watch’.  Unlike other ministers, did not reveal how he voted or issue a statement to say he supported the PM.

Churchill, Jo (Possible rebel)
Junior environment minister from Bury St Edmunds.  Backed Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 leadership contest.  She has publicly gone further than many ministers, writing in her local paper that, “many constituents have written to me about their anger and frustration at the current situation regarding Downing Street. I have made these views very clear to the prime minister”. Unlike other ministers, did not reveal how she voted or issue a statement to say she supported the PM.

Clarke, Greg (Possible rebel)
Remainer and former cabinet minister under David Cameron and Theresa May. He is the current chair of the science and technology select committee. Left the cabinet immediately in 2019, when Boris Johnson became PM.   Subsequently had the Conservative whip removed by Boris over Brexit. His Tunbridge Wells seat is not totally out of the reach of the Lib Dems and the Conservatives lost 10 seats here in the 2022 local elections.  Friend of Jeremy Hunt.

Crabb, Stephen (Possible rebel)
Welsh MP and former cabinet minister on the left of the party. He is chair of the Welsh affairs select committee. Backed Sajid Javid in 2019. He faces an uncertain future after constituency boundary changes have in effect abolished his old seat. According to Wales Online, he is reported as having written to a constituent, saying of the PM: “While he may not have attended some of the gatherings bfeing reported, he does have a special responsibility in setting the culture and standards at the heart of government. He was right to apologise this week, but this may not be a sufficient response given the seriousness of these matters.”

Crosbie, Virginia (Possible rebel)
Anglesey MP, elected in 2019, who would comfortably lose her seat to Labour based on current polling. Following the war in Ukraine, also said that now is not the time for ‘hasty action’. But in a sign that her mind is not fully closed on the matter, after the police issued a fine, she told the Rhyl Journal, that ‘Moving forward, I want to listen to my constituents over the next few days, I want to see the culmination of the investigation, and I want to speak to my colleagues when parliament returns next week’. After the publication of the Gray Report she told the same paper that, ‘The Prime Minister has my full support’.

Dinenage, Caroline (Possible rebel)
Former minister from the military seat of Gosport on the Hampshire coast.  She was sacked by Boris Johnson in his autumn 2021 reshuffle.  She backed Jeremy Hunt rather than Boris Johnson in the 2019 leadership content. Previously commented to ITV that, “People rightly have concerns. I have concerns”. In the May local elections the Conservatives did particularly badly in her Gosporrt seat losing out to the Lib Dems. On the day of the vote was asking constituents to tell her how they felt she should vote. Noft an encouraging omen for the PM.

Doyle-Price, Jackie (Possible rebel)
Essex MP for Thurrock. Former junior minister, who left the government as soon as Boris Johnson entered Downing Street.  Regularly reported in the media as being hostile to the PM. 

Drummond, Flick (Possible rebel)
Former Ofsted inspector. Was previously defeated in Portsmouth, but later returned for the safer Hampshire seat of Meon Valley in 2019.  In the past she told the Hampshire Chronicle that: “I am very disappointed to hear the prime minister admit he went to an event with drinks in the garden at Downing Street during the first lockdown”. She is Vice chair of the Conservative European Forum, and sits on the body with other figures whom are extremely hostile to the PM, such as Stephen Hammond and the former MP Dominic Grieve. Is a government PPS, but has failed to declare how she voted in the context.

Duncan Smith, Iain (Possible rebel)
Former Conservative leader who was once himself pressured out by the parliamentary party.  Backed Boris Johnson in the 2019 leadership election.   His previously safe Chingford seat in north London has become one of the most marginal seats in the country over the last decade, and now looks highly likely to fall to Labour at the next election. Mr Duncan Smith, previously told the i newspaper that the PM would find it difficult to hold onto his post if the force fine him.  Has not confirmed how he voted.

Farris, Laura (Possible rebel)
New MP elected in 2019 for Newbury.  Considered to be on the ‘One Nation’ wing of the Conservative party. Barrister whose late father was a Conservative MP for her current seat. In response to partygate allegations, she has told the BBC that, “The rules were clear and unequivocal at that point in time. I don’t think anybody thought you were meant to be having parties”.  Did not reveal to her local press how she voted.

Fell, Simon (Possible rebel)
Red Wall MP for Barrow and Furness in Cumbria. Would comfortably lose his seat to Labour based on current opinion poll levels. Was initially quiet on partygate but has recently said that it was unacceptable that those making the rules were “not following them”.  Linked in the media to the ‘pork pie’ plotters – a group of MPs elected in 2019 who are said to be hostile to Johnson. In public statements has suggested that a “belated apology is thin gruel to his constituents”.  Refused to say how he voted in the no confidence motion telling his local ‘Mail’ that ‘private ballots should remain private’.  Nonetheless after the vote, he was tweeting about the low majority the prime minister had obtained.

Ford, Vicky (Possible rebel)
Foreign office minister who backed Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election.  Sits on the left of the Conservative party.  A minister who has been very quiet in terms of making supportive noises of the prime minister.  Unlike other ministers, did not reveal how she voted or issue a statement to say she supported the PM.

Foster, Kevin (Possible rebel)
Junior home office minister from Torbay.  Backed Boris Johnson in the 2019 leadership election.  Has publicly noted how he and his wife did not visit a close relative who was seriously ill and passed away in early 2021, commenting to Devon Live that, “We therefore take the same view as other Torbay residents about allegations that others were not doing the same”.  As a Minister he stated his support for the prime minister.  However he was irked on Twitter to now have to travel to Westminster on the day of the no confidence vote, which seemed a little odd given a proxy vote system was in operation.

Freeman, George (Possible rebel)
Science minister, who supported Matt Hancock in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election.  One of a couple of government ministers who appear to have gone further than most in being critical of partygate.  Was reported by the Times to have written a letter to a Norfolk constituent in which he said he was “flabbergasted” by the allegations, and that those in positions of power, “shouldn’t seek to escape public responsibility or accountability”. Unlike other ministers, did not reveal how he voted or issue a statement to say he supported the PM.

Fysh, Marcus (Possible rebel)
Yeovil MP who supported Boris Johnson in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election.  Reacted positively to the appointment of fellow MP Andy Griffiths to help with the Downing Street operation, tweeting, ‘Great to see a Conservative appointed in Number 10’ (we presume a dig at Dominic Cummings). In September 2021, had written that the PM was ‘losing sight’ of what it means to be a conservative. Mr Fysh seemed spooked by the very poor showing of the Conservatives in the May elections in Somerset, where his own seat was once a Lib Dem stronghold for many years. He is quoted as saying that the parliamentary party needed to have a conversation about whether Johnson “is the right person” to lead them and the country.

Glen, John (Possible rebel)
Salisbury MP and current treasury minister under Rishi Sunak.  Former magistrate.  Backed Boris Johnson in the final stages of the 2019 Conservative party leadership election. Appears to have gone further than some ministers in publicly expressing his displeasure at partygate.  Writing in the Salisbury Journal he said, “I have made strong representations to my whip, conveying the anger of constituents and indeed my own conviction that this needs to be dealt with definitively”.  Continuing he said, “I do not and will not seek to defend what happened and will be continuing to make my feelings known”. Again after the publication of the Gray report, he revealed that he had held a “frank” meeting with the PM saying he was “in yellow card territory”. Unlike other ministers, did not reveal how he voted or issue a statement to say he supported the PM.

Graham, Richard (Possible rebel)
The MP for Gloucester, who would narrowly lose his seat if a general election reflected current opinion poll levels.  He backed Jeremy Hunt rather than Boris Johnson in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election. Has issued a statement in which he described the Downing Street gatherings as ‘illegal’, saying: “I want every prime minister to do his or her best for our country: and in that sense, they all, regardless of which political party they come from, have my support, but not at any price or under all circumstances”. 

Grant, Helen (Possible rebel)
Former sports minister who represents Maidstone in Kent.  Appointed by Boris Johnson in 2021 as his ‘Special Envoy for Girls’ and has been in both Nepal and South Sudan in recent months.    Once a Labour party member, she backed Boris Johnson in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election.  However, she is quoted in Kent Online as saying that Boris Johnson’s apology over partygate has done “little to quell her extreme concern over this very sorry state of affairs”.  Has made no indication that she supported the PM.

Green, Chris (Possible rebel)
Conservative MP for Bolton West who would narrowly lose his seat if a general election reflected the current opinion poll position.  Brexiteer who backed Boris Johnson in the 2019 leadership contest.  After the initial partygate claims, when asked if he still had confidence in the PM, he was reportedly silent for a period on BBC Radio Manchester before saying: “I think the silence does speak volumes”. 

Heald, Oliver (Possible rebel)
Veteran MP from Hertfordshire.  Remainer who backed Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 conservative leadership election. Reacting to the Gray Report he told his local ‘Comet’ newspaper that, “Clearly what has happened in Downing Street should not have happened and the police investigations and the full Gray Report will tell us where the fault lies”. After the Gray report he was quoted as saying that he was discussing with colleagues, ‘what happens next’.

Higginbotham, Antony (Possible rebel)
Red Wall MP for Burnley. Would comfortably lose his seat to Labour in any general election that reflects the current opinion polls. Has been linked to the ‘pork pie’ plot of Conservative MPs elected in 2019, having written on Facebook, that: “I am as angry and disappointed as you are”.  He has not commented on how he voted in the no confidence vote.

Howell, John (Possible rebel)
Succeeded Boris Johnson as the MP for Henley, but has been critical of Johnson in the past. Remainer, and one time tax inspector. In January told the Henley Standard this was a ‘difficult issue’, before going on to ‘reiterate’ how he didn’t vote for Johnson to be prime minister in the Tory leadership vote in 2019. 

Jenkin, Bernard (Possible rebel)
Veteran MP and Brexiter who backed Boris Johnson in the 2019 leadership election.  He chairs the House of Commons liaison committee. Previously quoted in the Independent as saying that the PM will be ‘judged on results’ over the next few months, before rather unhelpfully adding that Conservative MPs ‘need no reminder’ as to how to dispose of a failing leader.  Post the PMs mini cabinet reshfuffle, he was quickly on Sky News to claim MPs were not interested in the optics or impression of change. On the day of the no confidence vote, tweeted to say as a member of the privileges committee he would not be making any public comment on how he was voting.

Jones, David (Possible rebel)
Brexiter who backed Johnson in the 2019 Conservative leadership election.  Would lose his Clwyd West seat to labour at current opinion polling levels.   Previously said that his constituents are more concerned about the ‘cost of living’ than they are parties about Downing Street. After the Gray report he commented to his local Rhyl, Prestatyn and Abergele Journal that it ‘did not reveal any information that had previously been covered in press reports’. After the police issued the PM with a fine, Mr Jones was though quoted in the Rhyl Journal, saying of the PM that people ‘expected better of him’ and that he would be having ‘discussions with colleagues’.

Johnston, David (Possible rebel)
Newly MP elected for Wantage in 2019.  His seat would likely experience a knife edge contest with the Liberal Democrats in any election held on the basis of current opinion poll levels.  Has commented that he was not even going to try and defend ‘partygate’.  Has remained very tight lipped about how he voted in the no confidence vote.

Knight, Julian (Possible rebel)
Chair of the culture select committee, and author of the book, ‘Politics for dummies’.  Has taken a critical line on partygate, previously telling Times Radio: “What I would say is that it would be charitable to say that partygate, if you like, is due to acts of extreme stupidity on behalf of those at Number 10”. Continuing he said: “I’m very open minded about the future direction of the Conservative party, that’s all I want to say on the issue”. Has been further quoted in the Birmingham Mail as saying that, “everyone” believes prime minister Boris Johnson could be forced to quit.

Largan, Robert (Possible rebel)
Independently minded, Conservative MP for High Peak in the Derbyshire dales.  Elected in 2019 with a perilous majority of just 590 over Labour. In a letter that he wrote to a constituent, he has been reported as saying “I will not defend the indefensible. We cannot have a situation where it is one rule for politicians and another rule for everyone else. I can assure you that I will be taking the appropriate action to defend integrity in public life”.  Has not publicly commented on how he voted.

Latham, Pauline (Possible rebel)
Brexiter who represents Mid Derbyshire. Speaking to Derbyshire Live, she said, “Ultimately, the buck stops with those at the top”, but I am currently balancing these misjudgements against the prime minister’s successes during the pandemic”.  Told Times Radio that, “If he has lied to Parliament, there will be no choice”. After the police issued the PM with a lockdown fine, she was quoted in Derbyshire Live as saying, “As I said earlier this year, it is an extremely serious matter for the Prime Minister and the Chancellor to have been found to have breached the law. Even more so when it was a law they themselves repeatedly asked us not to break every single day during lockdown”.

Levy, Ian (Possible rebel)
The first Red Wall MP whose Blyth Valley result (small majority of 712) came in early on election night.  He told his local Chronicle paper that, ‘the public deserves better than this’.  In the media it has been speculated that he could be connected to the so called ‘pork pie’ plotters of MPs from the 2019 intake who are hostile to the PM. He has been quoted in the Daily Telegraph as saying that he was unable to see his wife’s mother when she was dying in a nursing home and that he understands the real public anger over the issue.  Also said that, “Waiting for the inquiry is not, ofn my part, an attempt to avoid the issue, but to ensure we can be aware of the facts”.  Has not commented on how he voted in the no confidence motion.

Loder, Chris (Possible rebel)
Former train guard who worked his way up in the railway industry. Elected in 2019 for West Dorset. Reported in the media to be a ringleader in the so called ‘pork pie’ plot of MPs elected in 2019 who are considered hostile to the PM. Wrote in his local paper, the Bridport and Lyme Regis News, that he was “deeply embarrassed and humiliated” by the revelations and that he was not convinced that the “evolving narrative” from the prime minister is acceptable.  Refused to comment when asked by the Dorset Echo as to how he had voted on the no confidence motion.

May, Theresa (Possible rebel)
Former prime minister.  Following the publication of the Gray Report, she was critical of Johnson in the Commons. You only have to watch this, and indeed any other interactions between the pair, to conclude that there is not much love lost here. 

Mayhew, Jerome
Barrister elected in 2019.  His late father, Sir Patrick, was once the long standing Conservative MP for Tunbridge Wells and former Attorney General. It is potentially hard to imagine Sir Patrick being impressed with current matters. After the PM was issued a lockdown fine by police, he told the Eastern Daily Press that, he needed to give the matter “serious thought” before he was able to respond.  He did not tell his local Eastern Daily Press how he voted.

Maynard, Paul (Possible rebel)
Former minister who backed Johnson in the 2019 content.  However he is reported in the Guardian as having said to a constituent that, “events of recent months have dented my confidence in the prime minister to say the least, and I feel he has seriously let the country as a whole down”. His Blackpool North seat would be on a knife edge if a general election reflected the current opinion poll position.  Has not commented on how he voted in the no confdence vote.

McVey, Esther
Former cabinet minister who backed Johnson after her own abortive bid in the 2019 Conservative leadership election.  Married to the Conservative MP, Philip Davies who himself submitted a letter of no confidence in the PM.  Reported to have been seen going into Downing Street recently for a meeting with the PM as part of a (potentially wavering) group of MPs on the right of the party.

Metcalfe, Stephen (Possible rebel)
Backed Michael Gove in the 2019 conservative leadership election.  Described in his local Echo newspaper how he watched his father in law’s funeral online at the time of the alleged parties in Number 10.   Originally cited anger from other members of his family, saying he didn’t know to what extent ‘Boris attended or joined in with these gatherings yet’.

Mercer, Johnny (Possible rebel)
Agitated former veterans minister from Plymouth who resigned from the government in 2021.  Another very independently minded MP.  In a public statement issued when the partygate allegations first emerged, Mercer said, “A truly terrible and sad day.  Awful for the people of Plymouth who have given and lost so much obeying rules imposed by Downing Street, a sad day for colleagues who have worked hard to support a No10 clearly out of control”.  Rather than back the PM, he told his local Plymouth Live website that he would not be commenting on whether he had submitted a letter of no confidence.  On the day of the no confidence vote, did not respond to Devon Online when asked how he voted.

Merriman, Huw (Possible rebel)
Remainer from Bexhill on the Sussex coast, and yet another select committee chair (this time of transport), who seems to have issues with the PM. During the Brexit debate, he previously argued for a second referendum.  He backed Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election.  Earlier in 2022 he told the BBC Radio 4 Today programme that he was “deeply troubled” by what was going on and that if a prime minister “doesn’t shape up”, then “they have to ship out”.

Millar, Robin (Possible rebel)  
His Aberconwy seat in north Wales would comfortably be won by Labour if an election was held based on current opinion poll levels.  He is a former director of the Conservative Christian Fellowship.  He has said that the mood among MPs was they were ‘really not impressed’ by the whole affair, describing the damage it was causing as ‘considerable’. Did not respond to Wales online when asked how he was voting.

Moore, Damien (Possible rebel)
Trade envoy for Tunisia and Libya, who backed Boris in the 2019 leadership contest.  Would comfortably lose his Southport seat to Labour  if an election was held today based on current opinion poll levels. Previously commented on social media that he was “extremely disappointed at this clear lapse in judgement” in relation to news that the PM had apparently briefly attended the May garden party.

Mordaunt, Penny (Possible rebel)
Ambitious trade minister and former TV celebrity diving contestant. She is touted in the media (despite the improbability of success) as a candidate to replace Johnson. Former defence secretary who left the government when Boris became Prime minister in 2019. She  backed Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 conservative leadership election. According to the Daily Mail is one of a few ministers who are on a so called ‘resignation watch’ reflecting their unease with the current situation. Unlike other ministers, did not reveal how she voted or issue a statement to say she supported the PM.

Mullan, Kieran (Possible rebel)
Former police special constable. Elected in 2019, but would comfortably lose his Crewe and Nantwich seat to Labour if an election was held on the back of current polling. Has been linked in the media with the so called ‘pork pie’ plot of MPs elected in 2019, Writing in his local newspaper column, he said: “The fact that I haven’t said he should resign does not mean that I accept or condone what has gone on, or that I agree that he should carry on.  It means I want to take a decision with the full facts”.

Percy, Andrew (Possible rebel)
Lincolnshire MP who backed Boris in the 2019 leadership election.  However has commented that he and his constituents are ‘frustrated and irritated’ by the partygate affair.  He has recently put forward the concept of a Freedom Bill’ to repay the covid fines of people who found themselves on the wrong side of the rules for anything other than ‘egregious’ offences.  

Robinson, Mary (Possible rebel)
Backed Sajid Javid in the 2019 leadership election. Would comfortably lose her Cheadle seat to the Lib Dems based on the current levels of Conservative polling. Posted on Twitter to say that she did not oppose the motion calling for a commons committee to investigate the PM, saying ‘trust in politics and in politicians is an integral part of the contract we have with the people we represent’.

Sambrook, Gary (Possible rebel)
Elected in 2019 for Birmingham Northfield with a slim majority of 1,640. Sambrook was initially identified as being part of the pork pie plot of MPs elected in 2019 that were hostile to the PM. He was also heavily rumoured to have put in a letter to the 1922 committee, having been quoted in the Daily Mail as saying: “The prime minister has admitted attending one of the gatherings but disputed its status as a party, and has apologised. We all will come to our own conclusions”

Selous, Andrew (Possible rebel)
Long standing MP from south west Bedfordshire.  He is chairman of the Conservative Christian Fellowship.  He has been quoted on Bedfordshire Live as saying he ‘was very angry and upset’ about the Downing Street gatherings, adding, “I have made my views very clear about the standards which I expect to be maintained by all those in power in future”.

Smith, Greg (Possible rebel)
Elected in 2019 for the safe seat of Buckingham.  Positioned on the right of the Conservative party.  Told his local Bucks Free Press that he was not sure that Johnson’s accounts at the Commons dispatch box were necessary helping his case, adding “My patience on this matter is very thin”. Lost both his grandparents during the pandemic and has said he will not defend Boris Johnson over partygate.

Smith, Julian (Possible rebel)
North Yorkshire MP and former government chief whip under Theresa May. He was later sacked by Boris Johnson as Northern Ireland secretary after just six months in the job. Located on the Tory left, and has been described by the Financial Times as being “opposed” to both the “tone and style” of the Johnson government. Agitated with the government’s approach to the Northern Ireland protocol.

Spencer, Ben (Possible rebel)
Psychiatrist. Younger MP elected in 2019 for a safe seat in Surrey.  He is a member of the Tory Reform Group on the moderate wing of the party. In relation to partygate he has issued a pretty strong statement on Facebook, in which he said: “The prime minister has set out his explanation, which is that he believed at the time it was a work event. I struggle with this … Clearly if it is found that the prime minister has intentionally misled parliament or knowingly broke the law his position would be untenable”.

Stride, Mel (Possible rebel)
Former leader of the House of Commons who having finally reached the Cabinet under Theresa May, was sacked after just two months in the job when Boris Johnson became prime minister. Remainer who backed Michael Gove in the 2019 Conservative leadership election.  The Sunday Telegraph reported in January 2022 that a meeting of up to 40 Conservative MPs took place in a pub close to Mr Stride’s London house. Did not respond to Devon Online when asked how he voted.

Timpson, Edward (Possible rebel)
Former PPS to Theresa May.  Son of Sir John Timpson from the Timpson retail group. Was initially quiet on partygate, but has started to show his hand after the PM was issued a fixed penalty notice. In a statement, he described the events as ‘shameful’ and said he was not prepared to defend the indefensible. In signs of real passion lurking within him on the matter he continued, “I am appalled that we did not see that selflessness at the heart of government, and can only say it makes the example that those who have contacted me about their own experiences set shine all the greater”.

Trott, Laura (Possible rebel)
Former aide to David Cameron.  Elected in 2019 for the safe seat of Sevenoaks in Kent.  Critical of Boris in the past, Trott made unwelcome comments during the 2019 conservative leadership campaign, suggesting that a Johnson victory might lead to an early General election and a Corbyn win. Under the current regime she may thus struggle for ministerial promotion. She has been quoted in her local Sevenoaks Chronicle after the Gray Report as saying, “The conclusions in the update are extremely serious”.

Walker, Charles (Possible rebel)
Tory Grandee, and independently minded MP for the very safe seat of Broxbourne in Hertfordshire, who is standing down at the next election. He previously stuck his neck out to thwart a 2015 plot to remove Commons speaker, John Bercow. He has already suggested that if Boris resigned, it would show great courage, telling Channel 4, “I would applaud him for doing that”.  Earlier in 2022, was quoted in the Daily Mail as saying the PM has 6 months to restore trust in the government.

Walker, Robin (Possible rebel)
Junior minister who supported Sajid Javid in the 2019 leadership election.  Like his father, the one time Cabinet minister and former MP for Worcester, Peter Walker, he sits on the left of the Conservative party.   Would lose his Worcester seat to Labour in any election that mirrored current opinion poll numbers.  Has though reacted moderately to the partygate affair saying, “I think some of the political attacks are trying to imply this was going deliberately behind people’s backs and laughing at people – I don’t think that is what it was”.   Told his local Worcester News that as a minister he couldn’t declare how he was voting, but this would really only seem to have been an issue if he was not planning on supporting the PM.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

3. Unknown and unclear (47 MPs)

Brady, Graham (Unknown and unclear)
The man who receives the letters, and who keeps his own counsel. He has been an MP since 1997.  However his once safe Altrincham and Sale West seat has become much more marginal in recent years.  Based on the current opinion polls, he looks likely to lose it quite comfortably to Labour if an election was held today.  Worth noting almost all of the other senior officers of the 1922 Committee appear hostile to Boris Johnson.

Brereton, Jack (Unknown and unclear)
Young MP who represents Stoke South.  In an election today, he would still hold his seat based on current polling.  He has been critical of the support that his local party is receiving local from Conservative HQ.  Currently serves as PPS to defence secretary, Ben Wallace. 

Browne, Anthony (Unknown and unclear)
Former Director of Economic Development for Boris Johnson during his time as London mayor.  Would lose his South Cambridgeshire seat to the Liberal Democrats based on current polling levels. At the same time as stating, that those ‘who make the rules need to obey the rules’, he has welcomed the prime minister’s plans to reform Downing Street. He told the BBC’s World at One programme in the week after the Gray Report that he was not calling for Boris Johnson to resign.

Bruce, Fiona (Unknown and unclear)
Cheshire MP and evangelical Christian who currently serves as the prime minister’s special envory for freedom of religion or belief.  She backed Sajid Javid in the 2019 leadership contest. Does not appear to have commented publicly on the PM’s future.

Butler, Rob (Unknown and unclear)
Former magistrate, first elected for Aylesbury in 2019.  Told his local newspaper, the Bucks Herald, that he would wait until the Metropolitan Police report is finished before offering a clear-cut response on what consequences the Prime minister should face.  Having not declared how he voted publicly, the PPS at the Treasury issued a statement on the day after the no confidence vote saying he supported the PM, but in which he then promptly went on state that he ‘shared’ the anger of votes.  He would have to resign as a PPS if he had not backed the PM.

Carter, Andy (Unknown and unclear)
Former magistrate elected in 2019.   Sits on a narrow majority of 2,010 in Warrington South.  Would easily lose his seat in any election that reflected current polling. After the Gray report was published he issued a statement to say that it was inappropriate for him to comment on the partygate, and subsequently on his vote in the no confidence ballot, given his role on the privileges committee.

Clarke, Theo (Unknown and unclear)
Staffordshire MP, believed to be friendly with the prime minister’s wife. According to her local Express and Star newspaper, has though not commented on how she voted.  

Costa, Alberto (Unknown and unclear)
Leicestershire MP who backed Michael Gove in the 2019 leadership election. Does not appear to have commented publicly on the PM’s future. Sits on the Commons privileges committee now investigating the PM. Has rebelled against the government in the past. Currently the PPS to the Attorney General.

Coutinho, Claire (Unknown and unclear)
Elected in 2019 for safe seat in Surrey.  Tipped as a future rising star of the party. Currently PPS to Rishi Sunak.  Has been active on the airwaves attacking claims by some MPs of bullying behavior by government whips. However according to the New Statesman, she has irked Number 10, by apparently championing Mr Sunak’s credentials to fellow MPs.  Did not confirm to her local Surrey Live media how she voted.

Cox, Geoffrey (Unknown and unclear)
Former Attorney General at the centre of outside earnings storm in 2021.  Supported Boris Johnson in 2019 and once seen previously as something of a Johnson ally.  Was though reportedly not best pleased to have been sacked as Attorney General. He has not though made any particularly notable public comments on partygate.  Did not respond to Devon Online when asked how he voted.

Davies, Gareth (Unknown and unclear)
First elected in 2019 for the safe seat of Grantham. Does not appear to have commented publicly on the PM’s future.

Davies, James (Unknown and unclear)
A medical doctor, who won the Vale of Clwyd back for the Conservatives in 2019.  Would comfortably lose the seat to Labour in an election that was held today based on the current polls. Does not appear to have commented publicly on the PM’s future.  Did not respond to Wales online when asked how he was voting.

Djanogly, Jonathan (Unknown and unclear)
Long standing MP for the safe seat of Huntingdon in Cambridgeshire, one that was previously represented by John Major.  He backed Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election. Rebelled over covid passports.  Said he was pleased to see the PM apologise to the Commons, but it was now necessary to wait for the full inquiry.

Drax, Richard (Unknown and unclear)
Reportedly one of the richest MPs. Brexiter who backed Boris Johnson in the 2019 leadership contest. Welcomed the reshuffle in early February 2022, and said he expected a ‘stream of blue narrative Conservative policies’ to burst out of No.10. In light of the windfall tax introduced by the government, Mr Drax did though accuse the government of ‘throwing red meat to socialists’.  He refused to comment to the Dorset Echo in terms of how he voted on the no confidence motion.

Edwards, Ruth (Unknown and unclear)
Elected in 2019, taking over Kenneth Clarke’s seat at Westminster, one which is becoming steadily more marginal. Does not appear to have made any notable public comment on partygate or how she voted.

Evans, Luke (Unknown and unclear)
Medical doctor with a safe seat in Leicestershire.  Said he conveyed his anger on partygate to the PM in person earlier in the year, First elected to Westminster in 2019.  Does not appear to have made any notable public comment around the future of the PM.

Evans, Nigel (Unknown and unclear)
Veteran MP and deputy Commons Speaker.  Backed Boris Johnson in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election and historically would be regarded as a supporter of the PM.  However he has said that he wouldn’t be commenting on the current situation given his role as a Commons Deputy Speaker.

Everitt, Ben (Unknown and unclear)
First to Westminster in 2019, but would comfortably lose his Milton Keynes North seat to Labour in any general election reflecting the current opinion polls.  Currently appears quiet about the future of the PM.

Fox, Liam (Unknown and unclear)
Former Conservative party chairman and GP.  Brexiter, who backed Jeremy Hunt rather than Boris in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election.   Previously said he was ‘extremely cross’ and ‘upset’ at the allegations albeit wanted the PM to stay on.  Post the publication of the Gray report has urged fellow Conservatives to get on with the big issues, calling for political stability and saying this was not the time for a leadership election.  Has not commented on how he voted in the no confidence motion.

Francois, Mark (Unknown and unclear)
Feisty Brexiter and long term opponent of John Bercow. He once submitted a letter of no confidence in Theresa May and backed Boris Johnson in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election.  Does not appear to have made any notable public comment on partygate. It is worth noting, that two of his close political friends on the right of the party, Steve Baker and Andrew Bridgen are amongst those openly calling for the PM to go.

French, Louie (Unknown and unclear)
New Conservative MP, elected in a December 2019 by-election in Old Bexley and Sidcup.  Has already rebelled on Covid, but has not made any public comment on partygate.

Gideon, Jo (Unknown and unclear)
Red Wall MP elected for Stoke on Trent Central in 2019.  Would easily lose her seat to Labour based on current opinion poll levels. She was publicly very critical of the first Downing Street party allegation, being quoted in the Stoke Sentinel as saying, “Like everyone, I spent the Christmas period in lockdown alone at home in Stoke-on-Trent, unable to see friends, family or colleagues. The allegations of Christmas parties in Downing Street and the video released by ITV have sparked outrage and should not go ignored, especially given the sacrifices we were all making during the same period”.

Grayling, Chris (Unknown and unclear)
Former cabinet minister who backed Boris Johnson in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election.  Does not appear to have made any notable public comment on partygate, or how he voted on the no confidence motion.

Griffiths, Kate (Unknown and unclear)
Elected for Burton in 2019.  Told her local ‘Times, Echo, and Life’ media that, “I know constituents are feeling very let down and angry at the latest allegations, and I feel the same”. After the Gray Report, she detailed that she had very ‘strong feelings’. Has also at times been listed as backing the PM.

Hall, Luke (Unknown and unclear)
Former junior minister, who was reshuffled out of the government in the autumn of 2021.    Backed Sajid Javid in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election.  Limited public comment on partygate aside from saying that, ‘I share the anger about allegations’.  Did not comment on how he voted in the no confidence vote.

Harris, Rebecca (Unknown and unclear)
Brexiter and now government whip with now one of the safest Conservative seats in the country in south Essex.  No evident public comments on partygate.

Henry, Darren  (Unknown and unclear)
Elected in 2019 as the MP for Broxtowe in Nottinghamshire.  Would comfortably lose the seat to Labour in a general election that mirrored current opinion poll standings. Has been very critical on partygate but the day after the no confidence vote appeared to suggest that he had voted for the PM.

Hollobone, Philip (Unknown and unclear)
Brexiter on the right of the Conservative party.  Special Constable in the British Transport police.  Initially commented that ‘there cannot be one rule for the government and one for the rest of us’ but has not made any recent comment on the future of the PM.

Hunt, Jane (Unknown and unclear)
Loughborough MP who would comfortably lose her seat to Labour based on current opinion polling levels.  Is a PPS to Steve Barclay, the minister recently put in charge of the Downing Street operation.

Jupp, Simon (Unknown and unclear)
Elected in 2019 for East Devon.  He is a former special advisor to Dominic Raab. Does not appear to have made any notable public comment on partygate.  Did not respond to Devon Online when asked how he voted.

Kawczynski, Daniel (Unknown and unclear)
Brexiter who backed Johnson in the 2019 conservative leadership election.  Would narrowly lose his Shrewsbury seat to labour if an election was held on the basis of the current opinion polls. Does not appear to have made any notable public comment on partygate.

Laing, Eleanor (Unknown and unclear)
Long standing MP for Epping Forest.   Unlikely to comment publicly given her role as the Deputy Speaker of the House of Commons.

Lewer, Andrew (Unknown and unclear)
Brexiter who backed Johnson in the 2019 leadership election.  Removed from his post as a PPS in 2020.  Under current polling, his Northampton South seat would comfortably be gained by labour.  Does not appear to have made any public statement on the PM’s future.

Logan, Mark (Unknown and unclear)
Red Wall MP for Bolton North East with a majority of just 378 votes.  In relation to the current difficulties, on Twitter he has said: “Let’s not beat about the bush. I, my constituents, this country, expect more”. Moving through the social media world, on Facebook he then commented, that the “prime minister sets the culture and example for the rest of the country”. In the media he been linked to the ‘pork pie’ plot of Conservative MPs elected in 2019. Was reported as having said he was going to support the PM in the confidence vote.

Lord, Jonathan (Unknown and unclear)
Surrey MP and Brexiter who backed Dominic Raab in the 2019 leadership election. Does not appear to have made any notable public comment on partygate.  Did not respond to his local ‘Surrey Live’ media’s request for details on how he voted.

Menzies, Mark (Unknown and unclear)
The MP for Flyde in Lancashire.  A remainer who supported Michael Gove in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election. Does not appear to have made any notable public comment on the future of the PM specifically.

Miller, Maria (Unknown and unclear)
Former Cabinet minister.   On the basis of current opinion polls, she would retain her Basingstoke constituency, but the battle with Labour would be very close. Does not, as yet, appear to have made any notable public comment on partygate. Was recently appointed Boris Johnson’s Trade Envoy to Canada.

Offord, Matthew (Unknown and unclear)
Backed Boris in the 2019 Conservative leadership election.  Would comfortably lose his Hendon seat to Labour if a general election was held today based on current opinion polls. Initially described the party revelations as “horrendous” and said the police should investigate.

Pow, Rebecca (Unknown and unclear)
Junior minister, who backed Boris in the 2019 leadership election.  Would face a knife edge battle to hold off the Lib Dems in her Taunton Deane constituency at current opinion poll levels. Does not appear to have made any notable public comment on partygate.

Prentis, Victoria (Unknown and unclear)
Jovial farming minister.  Remainer who backed Rory Stewart in the 2019 Conservative leadership election.  On the left of the party, and not necessarily a ‘political bedfellow’ of Boris Johnson. Nonetheless, issued a statement to say that she still supported the PM on the day of the vote. Understands the potentially ruthless nature of the parliamentary conservative party close up for many years, with her father sitting as a Conservative MP during the Thatcher era.

Randall, Tom (Unknown and unclear)
Elected in 2019 for Gedling in Nottinghamshire with a small majority of 679.   Some media reports have linked him to the so called ‘pork pie’ plot of newly elected MPs from 2019.  He was quoted on Nottinghamshire Live as saying, “People are rightly very angry about what has happened. I share that anger. We must all obey the rules, without exception, and be accountable for our behavior”.  On Twitter he claimed to have voted for the PM albeit in a lengthy statement that mentioned ‘on balance’ etc..

Saxby, Selaine (Unknown and unclear)
Devon MP, elected in 2019. Has been quoted in her local North Devon Gazette as saying she was ‘very disappointed’ at what happened in No.10, but at the moment she does not think ‘this is the right moment to initiate a ‘No Confidence’ vote in the Prime Minister’.  Did not respond to Devon Online when asked how he voted.

Skidmore, Chris (Unknown and unclear)
Supported Johnson in the 2019 leadership election, but was dismissed from his post of universities minister in a subsequent Johnson reshuffle. The result in his Kingswood constituency would be on an absolute knife edge if a general election reflected the current opinion poll levels.  Does not appear to have commented publicly on the PM’s future, either before or after the non confidence vote.

Smith, Henry (Unknown and unclear)
Backed Boris in the 2019 Conservative leadership election. Would lose his Crawley seat to Labour based on the current levels of Conservative polling.  May have been irked by the prime minister seeming to giggle at his recent Commons call for Crawley to be made a city. 

Tomlinson, Michael (Unknown and unclear)
Government whip who backed Boris in the 2019 leadership contest. Has not made any notable public comment on ‘partygate’.  Also did not respond to his local ‘Daily Echo’ as to how he voted in the no confidence vote.

Wallis, Jamie (Unknown and unclear)
Conservative MP for Bridgend with a slim majority of 1,157.  Elected in 2019, but would easily lose his seat to Labour in any election based on current opinion polling. Became the first MP to come out as ‘trans’ in March 2022. Does not appear to have made any notable public comment on partygate.  Did not respond to Wales online when asked how he was voting.

Watling, Giles (Unknown and unclear)
Supported Michael Gove in the 2019 leadership election. Has publicly referenced, ‘errors’ in judgment and describes himself as ‘let down by the whole thing’.  Although suggesting the PM has been putting in some good performances, he is also quoted in the Essex County Standard online as saying, “He must not get in the way of good governance and must not make us unelectable – and the jury is still out on that”.  

Williamson, Gavin (Unknown and unclear)
Sacked from the cabinet by Boris Johnson in 2021.  He was an active part of the PM’s leadership campaign in 2019, having been seen as hostile to Boris back in 2016.  Newspapers have also reported that an event held at the Department for Education during his tenure as secretary of state is also coming under scrutiny. Mr Williamson does not appear to have made any notable public comment on partygate. He was presumably pleased to be awarded a knighthood by the PM in March 2022.  His local Express and Star newspaper suggest he supported Mr Johnson, but if so, his support does appear low key.

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4. Probable supporter of the PM (30 MPs)

Allan, Lucy (Probable supporter)
Shropshire MP whose Telford seat would be subject to a close result with Labour at current polling levels.   PPS to Jacob Rees-Mogg. Ms Allan had previously described the PM’s position as ‘terminal’ in a letter to a constituent, but has since rowed back saying that is no longer the case. Following his intervention, Ms Allan criticised the former Conservative PM leader Sir John Major, saying in a tweet: “Trying to remove an elected PM with a huge personal mandate, mid-term, is anti-democratic”.

Andrew, Stuart (Probable supporter)
Recently appointed as the new housing minister by the PM. Former conservative deputy chief whip.  Backed Boris in the 2019 contest.  Would though comfortably lose his Pudsey seat in any election based on today’s polling.  Does not appear to have made any notable public comment on partygate.

Blunt, Crispin (Probable supporter)
Veteran and independently minded MP for Reigate.  Supported Johnson in the 2019 leadership contest.  Has previously suggested that in many homes and businesses the Covid rules may have been broken. Told the BBC that it is his “departure point” that the allegations levelled at Boris Johnson are not enough to topple a prime minister.

Buchan, Felicity (Probable supporter)
Kensington MP who possesses the second smallest Conservative majority at Westminster.  Did not initially appear to have commented publicly on the PM’s future, but provided support to the PM in an April debate in the Commons.

Cash, Bill (Probable supporter)
Veteran MP now in his eighties.  He has dedicated much of his political career to opposing the European Union.  Backed Boris in the 2019 contest.  Recently appeared supportive to the PM in the House of Commons.

Collins, Damian (Probable supporter)
Remainer representing Folkestone in Kent.  He backed Boris in the 2019 leadership election. He was recently quoted in Kent Online as saying, “I will decide what to do when we have all seen that report. I also hope that everyone in government reflects on the need for public confidence”. The day after the PM was fined by the police, he appeared to have become more supportive, breaking cover early on Twitter to state, “The parties are over and it’s time to get on with the job. He has my full support”.

Crouch, Tracey (Probable supporter)
Independently minded MP, who backed Boris Johnson in the 2019 leadership election.  A fellow animal welfare campaigner, she is said to be a long standing friend of the prime minister’s wife.  Crouch has been reported in the Daily Mail as saying that Carrie was hugely supportive of her recent cancer battle and ‘made a point of remembering all her treatment dates and sending a message’.  Accompanied the PM on a visit to a football club in her constituency in February 2022, and has said that outside of the Westminster bubble, Boris still has appeal.

Firth, Anna (Probable supporter)
The Conservative party’s newest MP, having been elected in February 2022 to succeed Sir David Amess in Southend West.  Commenting on the PM in relation to her election campaign, she is quoted as saying in the Southend Echo that, “The people I spoke to feel he is being victimised and there is a vendetta to bring Boris down.”

Freer, Mike (Probable supporter)
Current foreign office minister and former whip. Backed Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 Conservative party leadership.   Based on current opinion polls levels, he would likely lose his Finchley and Golders Green seat to the Lib Dems. Has been listed as a supporter of the PM, but in media interviews, also appears to have refused to say if he believed the PMs position is ‘safe’.  As a Minister he tweeted to say that he backed the PM, saying that Boris had supported him and his constituency personally. 

Fuller, Richard (Probable supporter)
Member of the Tory Reform Group, who sits on the left of the Conservative party.  Has said he doesn’t like the phrase ‘Big Dog’, but otherwise told the Bedford Independent that, “I believe the prime minister does understand the hurt that has been caused and that, as he said today, he accepts the need for significant change. This must now be done. I believe it is right that he is given the opportunity to implement those changes and to continue to lead the country.”

Goodwill, Robert (Probable supporter)
Former minister, who backed Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election.   Former MEP.  After the publication of the Gray report, and again after the police issued a fixed penalty notice, he confirmed to his local Scarborough News that the prime minister still had his support, adding “It’s not in the interests of the country for this to drag on”. His Scarborough and Whitby seat would be in the balance at the current level of opinion polling.  Has not though formally detailed how he voted in the no confidence vote.

Gray, James (Probable supporter)
Veteran MP who has been an MP in Wiltshire since 1997.  Has said he would wait for the findings of the inquiries and would not join a ‘kangaroo’ court against the PM.  After the publication of the Gray Report he issued a lengthy statement on his website in which he appeared to back the PM. He said, “He has got a great many things wrong, and the parties in Downing Street and associated events are very embarrassing. But they do not, in my view, amount to justification for removal of the PM. He has apologised and lessons have very plainly been learned. Let us leave it there and get on with the real and important business of running the country.”

Halfon, Robert (Probable supporter)
Independent minded MP, who backed Sajid Javid in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election. Has claimed that everyone has been ‘let down’ by the partygate affair, but has been quoted in the Daily Express as saying he is not ‘agitating’ for the Prime minister’s removal, saying that to change a government in the midst of a pandemic would be folly. He also has said that the public would not respect us for this bloodletting.  Supporting the PM he said, “I feel I owe Boris some residual loyalty. He won the 2019 election, got Brexit done and rolled out a worldbeating vaccine and booster programme. Even after Covid, our economy is growing strongly and the jobs miracle has returned”.

Hancock, Matthew
Former high profile health secretary who resigned from the government in 2021.   Commenting on partygate he told Sky News that ‘ultimately the government has got the big calls right’ and that he still thinks Boris Johnson has the ‘moral authority’ to lead the country. Gave the PM his backing once again after Johnson was fined by the police.

Hart, Sally-Ann (Probable supporter)
MP for Hastings since 2019, she would comfortably lose the seat to Labour based on current opinion polling levels. Another former magistrate who told Sussex Live, that she was ‘extremely concerned’ about the allegations made against the prime minister and had met the chief whip to highlight her concerns.  Did praise the PM on twitter on the day of the no confidence vote saying he represented the values of people in the UK beyond the Westminster bubble.

Hayes, John (Probable supporter)

Lincolnshire MP and Brexiter.  Suggested he was backing Boris on the day of the no confidence vote.

Holloway, Adam (Probable supporter)
Brexiter who backed Boris Johnson in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election.  Quoted in the Guardian describing the PM as “a really remarkable guy, who got an 80-seat majority”.  Says  that he believed the PM when he said he “didn’t know it was a party” Mr Holloway has commented in relation to the debate about the PM’s future that ‘I don’t believe in trial by television’. For those who don’t know, he was once a former TV reporter himself with ITN.

Jones, Fay (Probable supporter)
Once worked as a researcher for Prince Charles. Gained her Brecon and Radnor seat off the Liberal Democrats in 2019.  Would narrowly hold it if an election was held today based on current opinion  poll levels.  Has described the alleged rule breaking as ‘abysmal’, but has not publicly made any comments questioning the PM’s position. On the day that the PM was fined, wrote on Twitter, ‘Today’s revelations from the Met simply follow on from the PM accepting responsibility, accepting and implementing change’.

Johnson, Caroline (Probable supporter)
NHS consultant.  Brexiter who supported her namesake Boris in the 2019 leadership election. In response to the Gray report, told the House of Commons, that “I am glad that the prime minister has come here to apologise and to take on board the recommendations, but I am concerned that this is taking time and attention from key issues”.

Leigh, Edward (Probable supporter)
Veteran MP on the right of the Conservative party.  Backed Michael Gove in the 2019 leadership election. Issued a statement in February that said, “Given the grave problems facing us nationally and internationally, I don’t think there is anything to be gained by replacing the prime minister at the present time, nor do I think it is a proportionate response to events that took place in the prime minister’s house with his own colleagues.

MacKinlay, Craig (Probable supporter)
One time deputy leader of UKIP who backed Boris in the 2019 leadership election.   Based on current opinion poll levels would experience a  knife edge result with Labour in his Thanet South seat on the Kent coast.  Suggested that Mr Johnson has been ‘found wanting’ over the partygate affair, but has supported the government on the airwaves recently, and confirmed he has not sent in a letter of no confidence. He was quoted in the Daily Telegraph as saying, “Time is a great healer – we’re talking about events that were two years ago. They’ve lost their potency now”.

McCartney, Karl (Probable supporter)
Former magistrate.  Brexiter. His Lincoln seat would be comfortably lost to Labour if an election was held today based on current opinion poll levels.  From his Twitter activity, he appears to be backing the PM.   In February, McCartney told BBC Radio Lincolnshire that the partygate issue was not coming up on the doorsteps, adding that people want the government to ‘get on with the job’, and that this is what Boris Johnson and everybody else in government are doing. Confirmed on Twitter after the police fines were issued, that the PM still continues to have his ‘full support’.

Mumby-Croft, Holly (Probable supporter)
Independent minded MP for Scunthorpe, elected in 2019.  She voted for the extension of the free school meals scheme.  Would comfortably lose her seat to Labour if an election was held on the back of current polling.   Has called for the political debate to move beyond the partygate affairs albeit has acknowledged that ‘we must now wait for the police to finish their investigation without interference’.

Murrison, Andrew (Probable supporter)
Former surgeon commander in the Royal Navy. Backed Boris in the 2019 Conservative leadership election, and in his abortive 2016 bid.  Writing in the Guardian, he has accepted that the men in grey suits could call time on the PM’s premiership, but describes himself as a ‘serial Boris supporter.

Redwood, John (Probable supporter)
Veteran MP and one time stalking horse himself against John Major back in the 1990s.  The result in his Wokingham seat between the Conservatives and Lib Dems would be on a knife edge at current levels of polling. He recently called on the PM to get on the front foot with an agenda of low taxes and things that take you on the ‘ladder of opportunity’, saying in the Daily Express, “Those of us who support you, and that’s still most of us, want you to do well, but we want you to get on with this”.  Did not confirm that he had voted for the PM but keen to give him some advice on Twitter about cutting taxes immediately after the result.

Richards, Nicola (Probable supporter)
Young Red Wall MP, who has a majority of just 1,593 in West Bromwich East.  Has expressed her support for the PM and made it clear she was not amongst those MPs elected in 2019 that were considering a rebellion.  She told the local Express and Star that, “The PM helped win us seats like mine, he got Brexit done and has pulled us through the pandemic”.

Rosindell, Andrew (Probable supporter)
Positioned on the right of the Conservative party, and backed Boris in the 2019 leadership election.  Previously told Sky News that people should move on from discussing garden parties and cake, arguing, “Are we going to drag another prime minister out of office over something like that?”. He then added, “Lots of people break the law in small ways, sometimes unintentionally … He’s not robbed a bank – this is getting out of control.”

Tolhurst, Kelly (Probable supporter)
Junior minister who backed Boris in the 2019 leadership election.  Resigned from the government for personal reasons in 2021, but was praised by the PM as a ‘brilliant minister’. On the day the PM received a fixed penalty notice, Ms Tolhurst tweeted that the PM ‘had made changes accordingly in No.10’ and that this was not the time to ‘change our leader’.

Tracey, Craig (Probable supporter)
Brexiter who backed Boris in the 2019 leadership contest. Does not appear to have made any notable public comment on partygate. However he retweeted a tweet from the Media Guido account which asked why cake-gate now threatened to bring down the government, when the Times newspaper first revealed it over a year ago.  This may thus be a ‘useful tell’ as to where Mr Tracey sits on current matters.

Vickers, Matt (Probable supporter)
Elected in 2019, but would comfortably lose his Stockton South seat to Labour based on current opinion poll levels.  Former constituency agent to Rishi Sunak.   Appears publicly supportive of the PM having told Channel 4 that ‘Teesside’s got a lot to be happy about’.

Villiers, Theresa (Probable supporter)
Former long standing cabinet minister who was dismissed from the Cabinet in 2020.  Brexiter who backed Boris in 2019.  Her increasingly marginal Chipping Barnet seat would almost certainly be lost to Labour in any election based on today’s polling results.  Has though praised the PM for his work on the vaccination programme and said in the Commons that anyone ‘taking a view’ on the PM ‘must’ take that into account.

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5. Supporter of the PM (158 Conservative MPs)

Adams, Nigel (Supporter)
Minister without portfolio who was recently appointed to attend Cabinet.  Backed Boris in 2019, having wanted him to stand in 2016.   Regarded as part of Johnson’s inner circle. After the publication of the Gray Report, commented it was ‘time’ to let Boris get on with the job.

Afolami, Bim (Supporter)
Backed Johnson in the 2019 leadership election, seen as being on the left of the Conservative party.   If an election was held based on current opinion poll levels, he would lose his Hitchin and Harpenden seat to the Lib Dems.  The Conservatives suffered bad local election results in his constituency in May, Appeared pretty ‘forthright’ in his support for the PM during his May 31 ‘TalkTV’ interview. Tweeted his support for the PM on the day of the no confidence vote.

Afriyie, Adam (Supporter)
MP for the safe seat of Windsor.  Once considered a stalking horse to David Cameron, but does not appear to have such ‘beef’ with Boris.   Has responded moderately to the partygate affair, quoted in the Maidenhead Advertiser as saying, “People are rightly concerned about all the rumours about parties andfthe prime minister was right to explain and apologise”, before adding, “He has done wonders for this country with our vaccine rollout and keeping people in work and he has my full support in levelling up our country”.  Confirmed to his local Bracknell news that he had backed the PM.

Anderson, Stuart (Supporter)
Red Wall MP who won Wolverhampton South in 2019, but who would easily lose the seat in any election based on current polling.  Has been active on the airwaves in publicly supporting the prime minister, and believes he will win the next election. Has continued to offer the PM his support after the issuing of a Fixed Penalty Notice.

Argar, Edward (Supporter)
Health minister through the pandemic.  Backed Johnson in the later stages of the 2019 Conservative leadership election.  Has been defending the PM on the airwaves including a heated exchange on ITVs’ Good Morning Britain.  Told the BBC that he was voting for the prime minister on the day of the no confidence motion.

Atherton, Sarah  (Supporter)
First Conservative woman MP in Wales.  Gained Wrexham in 2019 but would comfortably lose her 2,213 majority seat in any election based on current polling.  In a joint statement with neighbouring Clwyd MP, Simon Baynes said she welcomed the PM’s apology and commitment to restructure Downing Street, but that it was ‘not appropriate’ to make judgements until the findings of the Metropolitan Police Investigation’.  Told Wales online that she voted for the prime minister.

Bacon, Gareth  (Supporter)
Took over from Boris’ brother in Orpington in 2019.  Served on the London Assembly at the same time as Boris Johnson was Mayor.  Does not appear to have commented publicly on the PM’s future. Announced he was supporting the PM on Twitter, on the day of the no confidence vote.

Badenoch, Kemi (Supporter)
Middle ranking minister, tipped for promotion to the cabinet in time.  She has not commented publicly on partygate from what we can seen. Confirmed she was backing the PM on twitter on the day of the no confidence vote.

Bacon, Richard (Supporter)
Norfolk MP, who supported Michael Gove rather than Johnson in 2019.   Independently minded.  One of the few MPs who once supported a motion of no confidence in former Commons Speaker, Michael Martin. However in February he came out fighting for Boris Johnson, telling Newsnight that the prime minister has done a “really good job” in “probably the greatest crisis we have faced in over a hundred years”..  Told the Eastern Daily Press that he had supported the PM.

Bailey, Shaun (Supporter)
Younger, red Wall MP for West Bromwich West who was elected in 2019.    Would easily lose his seat if a general election was held against the current polling backdrop. Following the police fine issued to the PM, commented on ‘Twitter’ that Boris Johnson was right to ‘hold his hand up’, but the focus should be on the cost of living crisis and Ukraine and that we now need to ‘get on with the job’. Tweeted his support for the PM on the day of the no confidence vote.

Barclay, Stephen (Supporter)
Cabinet minister, recently appointed chief of staff in Number 10.  Backed Johnson in 2019. Part of his inner circle.

Baynes, Simon (Supporter)
MP for Clwyd South elected in 2019.  After the issue of a fixed penalty notice to the PM, he tweeted to say, ‘The matter has been appropriately dealt with and now we should let him continue to provide the outstanding leadership he has shown through the Ukraine crisis’. Backed him on Twitter on day of no confidence vote.

Benton, Scott (Supporter)
Red Wall MP for Blackpool South.  Would comfortably lose his seat amidst current levels of polling. Has attacked Christian Wakeford for defecting to Labour and criticised Keir Starmer for refusing to apologise after drinking beer during lockdown.  Backed him on Twitter and TV on day of no confidence vote.

Berry, Jake  (Supporter)
Former northern powerhouse minister who backed Boris Johnson in 2019, albeit who has been critical of the government in the past.   He would narrowly lose his Rossendale and Darwen seat to Labour under current levels of opinion polling. However he recently told the Northern Agenda that Boris Johnson “still gets it right” on the big calls and remains “a good leader”.

Bhatti, Saqib  (Supporter)
Former Vote Leave board member, first elected for the safe seat of Meriden in 2019.  Hasn’t made any particularly notable public comments on partygate, but one of the first of the 2019 intake of MPs to be appointed by Boris as a government PPS. On the day of the issue of a fixed penalty notice to the PM, he tweeted to say the PM and Chancellor were right to apologise by ‘they must be allowed to get on with the job’. Tweeted his support on the day of the no confidence vote.

Bone, Peter (Supporter)
Sometimes outspoken social conservative.  Backed Boris in the 2019 leadership contest. Still behind the prime minister having recently defended him on ITV’s Good Morning Britain.  Has accused the media of “trying to take the prime minister down over a piece of cake”.  Told LBC that he found his constituents were in ‘support’ of the prime minister. On the day that the PM received a police fine, tweeted to say that Boris ‘is an exceptional PM’ who ‘got Brexit done, took us through the Covid pandemic, and is now leading Europe’s response to the war in Ukraine’. He reaffirmed his ‘100% support’ for Boris.

Bradley, Ben (Supporter)
Leader of Nottinghamshire County Council who backed Boris in 2019.  Initiallt told the Nottingham Post that ‘clearly a lot of mistakes have been made’. Following the Gray report he told his local Chad media that, ‘I’ve been pleasantly surprised by recent improvements in how that office [No.10] is working, under new management.’ adding, ‘So really I just hope that, now this is all published and everything is out there, a line can be drawn that means we can all focus on the huge national and international challenges we’re facing, rather than this.”

Britcliffe, Sara (Supporter)
Youngest Conservative MP.  Red Wall MP elected for Hyndburn in Lancashire in 2019.  Would comfortably lose her 2,951 majority seat in an election based on current election polling. Writing in her local newspaper, Britcliffe said, “There is clearly a case to be answered for and we need to make sure it is investigated fully. I will reflect on the findings as they come out and continue to listen to feedback from residents”.  Confirmed she would vote for the PM on Twitter on the day of the no confidence vote.

Braverman, Suella (Supporter)
Attorney General in the government.  Brexiter who backed Boris Johnson in 2019.  Praised the PM recently writing, “Got Brexit done. World-beating vaccine roll-out. 400,000 more jobs than pre-Covid. Keeping schools open & children learning. Building back better for all. All thanks to the leadership of Boris Johnson”.  We can assume she is still very much on side.

Bristow, Paul (Supporter)
Former lobbyist, who would comfortably lose his Peterborough seat to Labour if there was an election based on current polling. Was quoted in the Daily Mirror as saying that he had left a Commons backbench meeting with the Prime minister on Monday night, ‘absolutely pumped’ and that nobody had called for Mr Johnson to go. Backed him on Twitter on day of no confidence vote.

Burghart, Alex  (Supporter)
Junior education minister, and former PPS to Boris Johnson in No.10 between 2019 and 2021. 

Burns, Conor (Supporter)
Northern Ireland minister who was PPS to Boris Johnson when he was fforeign secretary.  Self described friend of the PM, and arguably the most visible face on the media currently defending Boris Johnson.  Suggested that Boris was ‘ambushed by a cake’ at one Downing Street gathering.   Election night in his Bournemouth West seat would certainly be uncomfortable, if not yet terminal, at current polling levels.

Cairns, Alun (Supporter)
Former secretary of state for Wales who backed Boris in 2019.  Would comfortably lose his Vale of Glamorgan seat in any election based on the current polling. Initially didn’t comment publicly on partygage, but after the issuing of a police fine, tweeted to say, ‘These are serious matters and the PM has said that people have the right to expect better’, but also added that ‘Ukraine must be our priority and the PM’s continued focus’. Backed the PM on twitter on day of no confidence vote.

Cates,  Miriam (Supporter)
Elected in 2019 for Penistone and Stocksbridge in South Yorkshire.  She would lose her seat to Labour in an election that reflected current opinion polling levels. She had previously told the Sheffield Star that, “whoever is found to have broken the rules must face consequences – according to the law – without fear or favour”. However on the day of the publication of the Sue Gray report she went on Sky News to defend and publicly support the prime minister.

Chisti, Rehman (Supporter)
Gillingham MP and one time Labour party Parliamentary candidate for Horsham.  Backed Boris in the 2019 contest.  Does not appear to have commented publicly on the PM’s future. He gave his backing to the PM in a BBC interview in mid May and tweeted that he was backing the PM on the day of the no confidencftoe vote.

Chope, Christopher (Supporter)
Independently minded veteran MP from Christchurch. On the right of the party.  Recently praised Johnson’s ‘fulsome apology’ over partygate.

Clarke, Simon (Supporter)
Cabinet minister from Teeside.  Once submitted a letter of no confidence in Theresa May.  Boris Johnson loyalist, who told Teeside Live that he absolutely stood by the PM, describing him as a “fantastic force for good in areas of the north”.

Clarke-Smith, Brendan (Supporter)
Red wall Conservative MP for Bassetlaw.  Won the seat in 2019 and may still retain it based on current opinion poll levels.  Brexiter, on the right of the Conservative party.  Recently praised the PM for his ‘fantastic’ performance at PMQs. On the day that Boris received his fixed penalty notice, took to Twitter to point to a number of fixed penalty notices received for traffic offences by opposition MPs. Can be regarded as a vigorous Boris supporter.

Clarkson, Chris  (Supporter)
Red Wall MP who has a majority of just 663 in Heywood and Middleton.  Seen as being on the left of the Conservative party. Following recent staff departures in Downing Street, tweeted, “Earlier this week the PM promised the parliamentary party swift and decisive change at No.10 to get us back on course and focused on people’s priorities – pleased to see true to his word he’s delivering”. Backed the PM on Twitter on the day the PM received a fixed penalty notice and on the day of the no confidence vote.

Cleverly, James  (Supporter)
Recently appointed Europe minister, who served on the London Assembly when Boris was mayor.  Backed Johnson in the 2019 contest.  Has defended the PM on the airwaves saying he is focused on the job.

Coffey, Therese  (Supporter)
Cabinet minister who backed Boris in the 2019 contest.   Has described Johnson’s apology as ‘sincere’ and said that the PM has worked ‘tirelessly’ to tackle covid striving to protect lives and livelihoods.

Courts, Robert  (Supporter)
Junior transport minister who backed Boris in the 2019 contest.  Has defended the PM on the airwaves, telling the BBC that it was important for the country to “rally behind” what the Prime minister has achieved during his premiership.

Davies, Mims  (Supporter)
Brexiter, and junior Minister who backed Boris Johnson in the later stages of the 2019 leadership election. Has recognized the public anger caused over partygate, but has not gone further in criticizing the PM.  She has said, “MPs heard the Prime minister rightly and sincerely offer a heartfelt apologies to the House of Commons Chamber and the nation at PMQs. He personally took responsibility, as he has for all matters at this time of dealing with this devastating pandemic and unprecedented economic challenge”.

Daly, James (Supporter)
The Conservative MP for Bury North with the honour of holding the party’s most marginal seat (105 votes).  He has been active in saying that he has not felt any pressure from government whips, but had not commented publicly on the PM’s future. Confirmed on the day of the no confidence vote that he would be supporting the PM.

Davies, David (Supporter)
Wales Office minster who backed Boris Johnson in the 2019 leadership contest.  Has publicly said the PM has his confidence.   The result in his Monmouth seat would be tight if an election was held based on current opinion poll levels. After the issuing of the police fines to the PM and Chancellor, he commented on Twitter that it was ‘Time to move on’.

Dines, Sarah (Supporter)
PPS to Boris Johnson and his parliamentary ‘bag carrier’ in the House of Commons.  Confirmed she voted for her boss.

Docherty, Leo (Supporter)
Junior defence minister. Former army officer who backed Boris Johnson in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election.  Has been reported as calling David Davis a ‘traitor’ for his Commons attack on the PM.  Stated his support for the PM in the confidence vote.

Donelan, Michelle (Supporter)
Universities minister who was promoted by Johnson to attend Cabinet.  Her Chippenham seat is not out of the reach of the Lib Dems. Told BBC Radio 4’s Any Questions that she was ‘angry’ about events in Downing Street but has pointed to other government achievements such as the growing economy and the jobs available. Did back the PM on Twitter on the day he received his fixed penalty notice, but interestingly was amongst one of the last cabinet ministers to do so. Did back the PM on Twitter on day of no confidence vote.

Dorries, Nadine (Supporter)
Cuture secretary. Long standing Johnson loyalist who actively supports the PM on radio and TV.  He can count on her support come what may.

Double, Steve (Supporter)
Appointed to the government whips office by Boris Johnson in 2021.  Previously submitted a letter of no confidence, but it was in 2018, against Theresa May. Remains supportive of Boris.  Following the Gray Report, told Cornwall Live that, “Whilst the report is critical of some of what took place I do not see anything in it that means the PM should resign. He has committed to change the things recommended in the report and I believe he should be allowed to make these changes”. Issued a statement after the issuing of fixed penalty notices to say the PM, ‘continues to have my full support’.

Dowden, Oliver (Supporter)
Appointed Conservative party chairman by Boris Johnson and has been defending the PM on the airwaves.   Previously worked in Downing Street for David Cameron.  Supported Boris Johnson in the 2019 Conservative leadership election.

Duddridge, James (Supporter)
Former junior foreign office minister from Southend East who left the government in 2021 but was appointed as a PPS to Boris Johnson in 2022.  Backed Boris Johnson in the 2019 leadership election. Has suggested MPs in Westminster have lost the plot telling Sky News, “People say to me ‘for God’s sake, tell Boris just to get on and run the country. That’s what’s needed”. One of the first Conservative MPs to back the PM on Twitter after he received a fixed penalty notice.

Duguid, David (Supporter)
Former Scottish office minister, who was dismissed from the government in 2021.  Backed Michael Gove in the 2019 Conservative leadership election.  Would be in danger of losifng his Bannff and Buchan seat to the SNP if an election was held based on current opinion polls.  Unlike all of the other backbench Scottish MPs, he issued a statement to suggest that he was voting to support the PM.

Eastwood, Mark (Supporter)
2019 Red Wall victor, whose marginal Dewsbury seat would be comfortably regained by Labour in any election based on current opinion polls. Afr after the PM was issued with a fixed penalty notice he appeared to offer more support, being quoted in the Yorkshire Examiner as saying, “People do not typically resign upon receiving a fixed penalty notice”.  Told his local Examiner press that he was backing Boris Johnson.

Ellis, Michael (Supporter)
Newly appointed minister for the cabinet office and paymaster general in the government, who has defended Boris Johnson at the Commons dispatch box saying the ‘Prime minister is going nowhere’.  Supported Boris Johnson in the 2019 leadership election, and on Twitter gave the PM his ‘100% support’ after the police fine.  Would lose his Northampton North seat to Labour in any General election reflecting the current opinion poll levels.

Elphicke, Natalie (Supporter)
Elected in 2019 as the MP for the once marginal Dover seat in Kent.  She looks likely to narrowly retain her seat if a general election was held on the basis of the current opinion polls. Former finance lawyer. Has publicly commented that she was ‘shocked’ by the partygate allegations, but would wait for the outcome of the Gray investigation. After the Gray report commented that ‘changes are underway in Number 10’, but said the government needed a ‘laser like’ focus on the cost of living. Announcing her backing for the PM on Twitter on the day of the no confidence vote.

Eustice, George (Supporter)
Environment secretary who has been supportive of the PM on the airwaves. Considered a Johnson loyalist. Initially backed Michael Gove in the 2019 leadership election.  Would lose his Camborne and Redruth seat in Cornwall to Labour if a general election was held on the basis of current opinion poll levels.

Evennett, Sir David (Supporter)
Veteran MP who first entered the Commons back in 1983.  He backed Boris Johnson in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election. Active member of St.Paulinus Church in Crayford. Did not appear to have made any notable public comment on partygate, but tweeted this support for the PM on the morning of the no confidence vote.

Fabricant, Michael (Supporter)
Long standing MP who backed Michael Gove in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election.  Previously voted against John Major and Theresa May in no confidence votes, but not this time…  He has praised the PM for delivering Brexit and the best vaccination programme in Europe, saying of Johnson, “He delivers and has my full support.” After the police fine, he described the situation as ‘grim’ but added that Boris Johnson is “not the sort of guy” to lie to the public. Fabricant has said he does not believe the PM misled parliament.

Fletcher, Katherine (Supporter)
Red Wall MP elected for South Ribble in 2019, and one who may narrowly retain her seat in any election based on current opinion poll levels.  Has said that many of her constituents thought the PM had been a ‘wally’, but given that “100,000 Russians have showed up” on Ukraine’s borders, they’re wondering why everyone is “talking about cake”….. Claims Boris Johnson remains the best chance of delivering a ‘northern powerhouse’.

Fletcher, Nick (Supporter)
Red Wall MP electedf for Don Valley in 2019, but who would lose the seat to Labour in any election held on current polling. In February told the Yorkshire Post that, “I do not believe a leadership election, at this time, is the best thing for the country.” After the Gray Report he told his Rotherham Advertiser that he was supporting his party leader through a difficult situation. Reiterated the same on Twitter on the day of the no confidence vote.

Fletcher, Mark (Supporter)
Defeated Dennis Skinner in 2019, but would now comfortably lose his Bolsover seat to Labour in any election based on current polling levels.  Brexit supporter who describes himself as being driven by his ‘working class British values’.  Quiet on partygate, albeit in past times has praised the PMs optimism and described him as a “brilliant” politician and leader.

Frazer, Lucy (Supporter)
Treasury Minister who works with Rishi Sunak.   Tipped for the cabinet one day.  Backed Boris Johnson in 2019.   The Lib Dems would mount a close and possibly successful challenge in her South East Cambridgeshire seat based on current opinion polling levels. Stated on Twitter on the day of the no confidence vote that she would support the PM.

Gibson, Peter (Supporter)
Red Wall MP elected in 2019, who would likely lose his Darlington seat to Labour if an election reflected current opinion poll levels.  Unlike some of the supposed ‘pork pie’ plotters from nearby constituencies, he is seen as actively supporting the PM.  After recent Downing Street staff departures, tweeted, “Great to see the change that Boris Johnson promised in Downing Street being delivered”.  Stated that he voted for Boris Johnson in the no confidence vote despote the PM’s ‘human flaws’.

Gove, Michael (Supporter)
Levelling up secretary and long standing cabinet minister.  Has been backing the prime minister on the airwaves and there have also been media reports that he has been out ringing MPs to sure up support for the PM. 

Griffith, Andrew (Supporter)
Former Sky TV finance director, who was appointed as minister for policy by Boris Johnson in February 2022.   Johnson loyalist who lent Boris use of his Westminster house in the 2019 leadership campaign.  Has a safe seat in West Sussex.

Grundy, James (Supporter)
Red Wall MP elected for Leigh in Greater Manchester in 2019.  Has a small majority and would comfortably lose his seat if any election was held based on today’s opinion polls.  Has criticized both Boris Johnson and Keir Starmer in the same statement for attending drinking events with staff during lockdown.  After the Gray report, he said, “Concern about the cost of living crisis is the major concern for my constituents. I don’t believe it’s time to be blowing up the Government”.

Gullis, Jonathan (Supporter)
Brexiter. Red Wall MP for Stoke on Trent North.  Based on current opinion polling, Labour would likely regain his seat in any general election held today.  Is though a loyal supporter of the PM who has previously suggested on Twitter that those who had submitted no confidence letters were now withdrawing them.

Hands, Greg (Supporter)
Business minister.  On the free market right of the Conservative party.  Backed Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election.  Has though been on the airwaves backing the PM and saying he was ‘taking charge’ after committing to changes following the Gray Report.

Harrison, Trudy (Supporter)
Junior transport minister.  Former PPS to Boris Johnson.  Would lose her Copeland seat to Labour based on current opinion poll levels. Has not commented on the partygate affair aside from to claim that she herself did not attend any parties.  Given her role for a number of years as part of Johnson’s inner circle in Downing Street, he is assumed to back the PM. After the PM and Chancellor received a fixed penalty notice she was quoted in Cumbria Crack as saying, I support them in continuing getting on with the job in hand”.

Hart, Simon (Supporter)
Secretary of State for Wales and Johnson loyalist.  Active defending his boss on the airwaves.

Heappey, James (Supporter)
Defence minister, whose Wells seat in Somerset would be on the brink of being won by the Liberal Democrats at current opinion poll levels. Backed Boris Johnson in the 2019 Conservative leadership election.  Was himself a former PPS to Johnson in Number 10.  He has defended the PM on the airwaves saying he has a hectic schedule bouncing around from one thing to another in “5 minute blocks”.  Has said he wants Boris to lead the party into the next election.

Heaton-Harris, Chris (Supporter)
The new government chief whip.   Brexiter who supported Boris Johnson in the 2019 Conservative leadership election.  Even before his appointment, he was reported in the media as being active trying to shore up support for the PM within the parliamentary party.

Henderson, Gordon (Supporter)
Brexiter MP from north Kent.  Defended the PM in relation to his attack on Sir Keir Starmer over Jimmy Saville.  Was reported by KentOnline to be backing the prime minister.

Hinds, Damian (Supporter)
Home office minister, who actually previously resigned from the Cabinet when Boris Johnson first became prime minister.   Supported Michael Gove in the 2019 leadership contest.  However he was more recently brought back into the government by Johnson.   Has said he has been ‘shocked’ by the allegations but has defended the record of the PM on the airwaves telling ITV’s GMTV in January that he still had confidence in the PM. He told his local ‘Petersfield Post’ that he was still backing the PM despite the fixed penalty notice issued by the police. Tweeted his support on the day of the no confidence vote.

Hollinrake, Kevin (Supporter)
Backed Michael Gove in the 2019 Conservative party leadership election.   Previously has commented that he didn’t think the PM had lied to Parliament, and in February issued a statement to say that the PM currently has his support.  Has also been on the airwaves.  He left in the caveat that he will review his position following the conclusion of the police investigation, but on the day of the fixed penalty notice being issued tweeted, ‘No doubt mistakes made, but don’t believe they merit a resignation of the PM or Chancellor’. The day after the police issued the PM with a fixed penalty notice, he wrote on Twitter, ‘Big difference between knowlingly and inadvertently misleading the house’.

Holden, Richard (Supporter)
Red Wall MP for North West Durham with a small majority of 1,144. Would comfortably lose his seat in any general election based on current opinion polling.  Mr Holden has been involved in referring claims about Sir Keir Starmer’s alleged lockdown breaches to Durham police.

Hughes, Eddie (Supporter)
Junior minister promoted by the PM.  Brexiter who backed Boris Johnson in the later stages of the 2019 Conservative leadership election. Does not appear to have made any notable public comment on partygate. Confirmed on Twitter that he had voted for the PM soon after the polls opened for the vote of no confidence.

Howell, Paul (Supporter)
Red Wall MP for Tony Blair’s old seat of Sedgefield. Would lose the seat to Labour if a general election was held on the basis of current opinion polling. He has said he has been appalled by the reported behaviour. At the start of the year, he wrote on Facebook that “in a democracy, nobody is above the law, and those who make the rules cannot retain credibility if they are found to have broken the rules themselves”. In April, on Twitter he appeared to have somewhat softened his stance after the police issued their fines to the PM and the Chancellor, and pointed to the work they were doing levelling up. He said it was right that those who broke the rules that they helped implement faced the consequences, but said in relation to the 10 minute meeting that lay behind the pair’s fine, that “I do not consider it to be a resigning matter”. He claimed he would support the PM on Twitter on the day of the no confidence vote.

Huddleston, Nigel (Supporter)
Junior minister.   Backed Sajid Javid in the 2019 leadership election.  Member of the Tory Reform Group on the left of the Conservative party. In public he said he will be studying events as they unfold and that the PM was right to apologise. After the police fines were issued, he gave the stock line you might expect of a government mininster, saying of Johnson and Sunak, “They have my support because I know that they, and the whole government, are committed to delivering on the priorities of the British people including dealing with the situation in Ukraine, the recovery from the pandemic, and the cost of living”. Backed the PM on Twitter on day of no confidence vote.

Hunt, Tom (Supporter)
MP for Ipswich, first elected in 2019. Former researcher to Oliver Dowden. Has been highly critical of the Downing Street event that occurred the night before Prince Philip’s funeral saying it filled him “with disgust”. Has reportedly had an in-person meeting with the PM over the matter. According to the Guardian he has also criticised “cack-handed” backers of the prime minister, suggesting that they should disable their social media platforms and cease carrying out media interviews. Has though been supportive of the PM over the Ukraine war, and backed him on Twitter on the day of the no confidence vote.

Jack, Alister (Supporter)
Secretary of state for Scotland. Would be in danger of losing his Dumfries and Galloway seat to the SNP if an election was held based on current opinion polls.  Has previously commented in relation to partygate that ‘when the cat’s away, the mice were playing’ and has described Boris as an ‘excellent prime minister’.

Javid, Sajid (Supporter)
Health secretary and former chancellor.  Has been defending the Prime minister on the airwaves over the last month, and comfirms that the PM has his support. A potential successor if Mr Johnson was to fall.

Jayawardena, Ranil (Supporter)
Ambitious junior minister with a safe seat in rural Hampshire. Supported Boris Johnson in the 2019 leadership election. Confirmed on Twitter that he had voted for the PM in the no confidence vote.

Jenkinson, Mark (Supporter)
Brexiter and red wall MP who gained Workington in 2019, but who would comfortably lose the seat to Labour  in any general election held on the basis of current opinion poll levels.   Tweeted to say that both he, and the majority of his constituents, are behind the PM and that this is an ‘exciting period for Britain’.  Told ITV news that he didn’t think he would be being asked about the future of a PM in relation to a fixed penalty notice, if the notice was say, for parking a car on a red line. On the day that the PM received a fine, tweeted that Boris Johnson ‘is the de facto leader of the free world’.

Jenkyns, Andrea (Supporter)
Previously wrote a letter of no confidence in Theresa May. Brexiter who backed Boris in the later stages of the 2019 leadership election. Government whip.The result in her Morley and Outwood constituency would be on a knife edge at current opinion poll levels.

Jenrick, Robert (Supporter)
Former cabinet minister who was sacked by Boris in a 2021 reshuffle.  Was previously quoted by Lincolnshire Live as saying that he continued to support the prime minister, and that there was neither an internal nor external threat to Mr Johnson’s position. Reiterated his support for the PM during an interview on BBC Radio 4’s ‘World at One’ the day after the issuing of a fixed penatly notice, saying the PM had got the big calls right.

Johnson, Boris (Supporter)
One MP we can have absolute certainty on.

Johnson, Gareth (Supporter)
Government whip, who supported his namesake in the 2019 conservative leadership election.  Has not made any notable public comment on partygate.  Was reported in KentOnline to be backing the prime minister.

Jones, Marcus (Supporter)
Has been given a senior role within the government whips office by Boris.  Has not made any notable public comment on partygate, but working in the whips office is assumed for now to back the PM. Backed him on Twitter on day of no confidence vote.

Keegan, Gillian (Supporter)
Health minister. On the left of the Conservative party having backed Rory Stewart and then Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 leadership contest.   Godmother to John Bercow’s children. She was booed in April on Radio 4’s ‘Any questions’ when appearing to dodge a series of questions on whether the PM and Chancellor behaved ethically. She claimed on Twitter to be supporting the PM on the day of the no confidence vote.

Knight, Greg (Supporter)
Veteran MP, who was a whip in the Major government.  Brexiter who backed Johnson in the 2019 leadership election.  He has issued a statement saying that he feels it is “judicious” to await the outcome of the inquiries rather than passing judgement or comment when only part of the circumstances have been reviewed.  Reported in the press to have said he was backing the PM on the day of the vote.

Kruger, Danny (Supporter)
Former speech writer for David Cameron and one time political secretary to Boris Johnson. Son of ‘Bake Off’ presenter. Elected to Westminster in 2019 for Devizes in Wiltshire. Initially it appeared that he might be turning on his former boss. In a statement on his website, he wrote that he was sorry that so many “lifelong Conservative voters” have decided they cannot vote for us again while Boris Johnson is leader. Continuing he wrote: “They represent the respectable tendency which is the foundation of our party and indeed our country: the people who believe in following the rules, being straight with people and being accountable for your conduct. It is a very bad moment when so many people like this lose faith in a Conservative prime minister”. However on the day that the PM received a fixed penalty notice, he appeared to have softened his approach, writing on Twitter, ‘But if this is it – the PM being given a birthday cake by colleagues in his office, at a no doubt awkward gathering lasting less than 10 minutes – then of course he mustn’t resign’. He has since supported the PM in the Commons debate of 21st April saying of the PM, that “patently he didn’t break the law deliberately”. Tweeted his support for the PM on the day of the no confidence vote.

Kwarteng, Kwasi (Supporter)
Business secretary and long time Boris Johnson ally.  Has defended the PM on the airwaves saying that he does not accept that it is ‘inevitable’ that Mr Johnson will be forced to quit.

Lewis, Brandon (Supporter)
Secretary of state for Northern Ireland.  Has backed the PM on the airwaves claiming he is sincere in his apology and that, ‘we have got the right person leading the country’.

Lopez, Julia (Supporter)
Junior Minister and the MP for Hornchurch. Backed the PM on Twitter on day of leadership vote.

Longhi, Marco (Supporter)
Brexiter who gained his Dudley North seat with a big majority in 2019.  Even on current polls could potentially hold the seat in any general election held today. On the day the PM received a fixed penalty notice, he tweeted to say, ‘The PM has my full support’. Told his local ‘Express and Star’ that the Labour party were ‘scared’ of Boris.

Lopresti, Jack (Supporter)
Brexiter who backed Boris in the 2019 leadership election.  Would comfortably lose his Filton and Bradley Stoke seat to Labour based on current opinion polls. He is married to Andrea Jenkyns, who serves in the government whips office.

Maclean, Rachel (Supporter)
Conservative MP for Redditch who supported Michael Gove in the 2019 Conservative leadership election. Has defended the PM on the airwaves, telling the BBC’s Politics Live show that, “No, of course I don’t think he should resign. This is clearly an opposition-driven campaign.”

Malthouse, Kit (Supporter)
Policing minister.  Formerly deputy Mayor of London under Boris Johnson between 2008 and 2016.  Has publicly tweeted support for the PM saying that he has ‘delivered’.

Mak, Alan (Supporter)
Appointed to the government whips office in September 2021 by Boris Johnson. Represents a safe seat on the Hampshire coast.  He has not made any public comment on partygate. Supported Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 leadership contest. On Twitter, confirmed that he would support the PM on the day of the no confidence vote.

Marson, Julie (Supporter)
Hertforshire MP elected in 2019. Previously wrote on Facebook that she was ‘appalled’ by events at Downing Street.   She has been quoted recently in her local Bishop Stortford Independent newspaper saying that Boris Johnson enjoys her ‘full support’, albeit she has left it out there, that she wants to see the results of the ‘ongoing police investigation’. Reportedly has a blonde cockapoo pet dog called Boris. Released a statement on the day of the no confidence vote to say she was supporting the PM.

Mann, Scott (Supporter)
Government whip. Brexiter who backed Johnson in the later part of the 2019 Conservative leadership election. Quoted in Cornwall Live as saying of the Gray Report that, “Whilst the report is critical of some of what took place I do not see anything in it that means the PM should resign”.

McCartney, Jason (Supporter)
Independently minded MP who has rebelled against the government in the past. His Colne Valley seat would comfortably be lost to Labour if an election was held today based on current opinion poll levels.  Has previously told the Yorkshire Post that the PM was a politician who ‘manages to break through all that bland and sterile sort of politics and connect with people’, saying in January that the PM still had his backing. After the PM received a fixed penalty fine, he was quoted in the Yorkshire Examiner as drawing a parallel between Mr Johnson and other local people who had been fined for Covid breaches, suggesting that none of them had lost their jobs.  Confirmed to the Examiner that he was supporting the PM in the no confidence vote.

McPartland, Stephen (Supporter)
Independently minded MP who has been prepared to vote against the government in the past.  Backed Boris in the 2019 leadership election.  Recently praised the PM on Twitter for calling the Labour leader a ‘lawyer not a leader’.  He has also stated that the Conservatives “were getting on with the job”. Would lose his Stevenage seat to Labour if an election was held today based on current opinion poll levels. Backed the PM on Twitter on day of no confidence vote.

Mackrory, Cherilyn (Supporter)
Brexit supporting MP from Falmouth and Truro.  Has said she will not be making any comment ahead of the Met Police investigation, suggesting that people were ‘no further forward’ after the Gray report. Would comfortably lose her seat to Labour if an election was held today based on current opinion poll levels.  Did Tweet that she would be supporting the prime minister on the evening of the vote.

Milling, Amanda (Supporter)
Foreign office minister, and former Conservative party chair who worked closely with the PM for a couple of years.  Supported Boris in the 2019 leadership electfion. After the fixed penalty notice was issued she wrote on Twitter, “The PM’s the right person to lead the country and focus on getting on with the job of delivering for the British people and protecting Ukraine from the tyranny of Russia”.

Mohindra, Gagan (Supporter)
Elected in 2019 for a safe seat in Hertfordshire.  He has since been appointed a PPS. Does not appear to have made any notable public comment on partygate. Confirmed on the day of the no confidence vote that he would support the PM.

Morris, David (Supporter)
Accomplished song writer who backed Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 leadership contest.  Would comfortably lose his Morecambe and Lunesdale seat to Labour if an election was held on the back of current polling.  Does though appear to be backing the PM, suggesting that a ‘beer party’ attended by Keir Starmer is something that the police should consider looking at. Suggested in the Commons that Boris is ‘leading the world against Putin’. Tweeted his support for the PM on the day of the no confidence vote.

Morris, James (Supporter)
Government whip.  Backed Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 leadership election.  He is quoted in his local Halesowen News as welcoming the PM’s response to the Gray inquiry, and was seen praising him for his ‘strong leadership’. Backed the PM on Twitter on day of no confidence vote.

Morrissey, Joy (Supporter)
Elected in 2019 for the safe seat of Beaconsfield.  In the aftermath of Downing Street staff departures, tweeted her support saying, “The PM promised changes to the No10 operation earlier this week, glad to see him delivering tonight”. Recently appointed a PPS to the PM.

Morton, Wendy (Supporter)
Transport minister who supported Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 leadership election. Does not appear to have made any notable public comment on partygate, but was promoted to Minister of State in the February 2022 government reshuffle. Soon after the PM was issued a fixed penalty notice she tweted to say, ‘We need to stay focussed on Ukraine and delivering for the people of the UK. He is the right person to do this for our country’.

Mortimer, Jill (Supporter)
Conservative MP for Hartlepool having gained the seat in a famous by-election during better times for the prime minister in the spring of 2021.  She has told her local newspaper that she doesn’t wish to make any comment until the investigation into the issue has been concluded.

Murray, Sheryll (Supporter)
Cornish MP and Brexiter who backed Boris in the 2019 leadership contest, and who previously submitted a letter of no confidence in Theressa May.  Her public position appears to be that she wants to wait for the full report before making any further comment. On the day of the no confidence vote, she tweeted her support for the PM.

Nici, Lia (Supporter)
Red Wall MP for Great Grimsby.  Seen as a staunch defender of the PM who lent some support on Radio 5 Live to the PMs attack on Sir Keir Starmer in relation to his time at the Crown Prosecution Service.  Just appointed as a PPS to the PM. Opinion polls suggest she may narrowly retain her seat if there was a general election held today.

O’Brien, Neil (Supporter)
The first from the 2019 batch of newly elected MPs to be appointed to the government by the PM,  which certainly counts as notable recognition from Mr Johnson.  Previously the PM’s levelling up advisor.   Has so far just given the flat response of ‘closely following developments’ and ‘having concern’ over partygate. Backed the PM on Twitter on day of no confidence vote.

Opperman, Guy (Supporter)
Hexham MP and junior minister who supported Michael Gove in the 2019 conservative leadership election.   Tragically his new born baby twins died during the pandemic, and he was unable to go and see his wife in hospital.  This was at the time of some of the alleged events in Downing Street.   He told the BBC in relation to partygate that, “I feel pretty emotional about this”.  In statements that have gone much further than most government ministers he said the PM “needed to change his ways”.  The result in his Hexham seat would be on a knife edge at the current level of Conservative opinion polling. In April 2022, after the PM was issued with a fixed penalty notice, he was though making more supportive noises. In a long twitter statement he said the PM had his support. Reiterated that on the day of the no confidence vote.

Patel, Priti (Supporter)
Home Secretary who was appointed and has been subsequently defended by Boris Johnson.  Is seen as a strong Boris ally.

Penning, Mike (Supporter)
Hemel Hemstead MP who supported Boris Johnson in the 2019 Conservative leadership election.  Beyond his name mistakenly appearing on a related Commons motion, does not appear to have made any public comment on the future of the PM. In March he was though appointed by Boris as the Conservative Party’s Vice Chairman for Candidates.

Philp, Chris (Supporter)
Junior minister, who backed Sajid Javid in the 2019 Conservative leadership election.  He has defended the prime minister previously, telling the BBC in January that, “The reason that the prime minister initiated an investigation with an impartial civil servant with such a high reputation is to make sure all of the facts do come out”. Stated his support for the PM on Twitter on day of no confidence vote.

Pincher, Christopher (Supporter)
Deputy chief whip, who backed Boris in the 2019 conservative leadership election.   Reported to be leading the ‘Save Boris’ campaign within Parliament.

Pritchard, Mark (Supporter)
Supported Boris Johnson in the 2019 Conservative leadership election.  Clashed with John Bercow when he was Speaker. He is quoted in his local Shropshire Star as saying that it is right that the Gray report should not prejudice any ongoing police investigation’ and that ‘more definitive conclusions’ will come in time. He recently told his local newspaper that he welcomed the appointment of the new Chief Whip. Was quoted in the Shropshire Star as saying that the PM was ‘contrite and humble’ in the light of his fixed penalty notice. Backed him on Twitter on day of no confidence vote.

Pursglove, Tom (Supporter)
Junior justice minister. Brexiter who backed Johnson in the later stages of the 2019 Conservative leadership election.   Would lose his Corby seat to Labour if a general election was held today based on current opinion polls. Did not appear to have commented publicly on the PM’s future, but indicated his support on Twitter on the morning of the no confidence vote.

Quin, Jeremy (Supporter)
Defence Minister.  Responded to partygate by saying, “The prime minister was absolutely right to apologise very clearly in PMQs. There is a full investigation into the allegations and I am keen for it to complete its work as soon as possible”.  Posted a statement on his website to say he had voted for the PM.

Quince, Will (Supporter)
Junior education minister who backed Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 conservative leadership election.  Would lose his Colchester seat to Labour if a general election was held today based on current opinion polls.  Reported in his local  Essex County Standard press as having welcomed the PMs apology and given him his backing. Supported the PM on Twitter on day of no confidence vote.

Raab, Dominic (Supporter)
Deputy prime minister, who has been busy defending his boss on radio and TV in the last month.   Remains publicly supportive of the PM, saying, “I’m sure he will continue for many years to come”.  The same may not though, necessarily be true for Mr Raab.  Based on current polling over the last few months, he would comfortably lose his now marginal Esher seat to the Liberal Democrats in a general election.

Rees Mogg, Jacob (Supporter)
New minister for Brexit opportunities, former leader of the House of Commons and Boris loyalist.   Recently commended that, ‘I think the Prime minister has got things right again and again’.

Rowley, Lee (Supporter)
Junior welfare minister who backed Boris in the 2019 leadership election.  Does not appear to have commented publicly on the PM’s future. Confirmed he would support the PM in a tweet on the day of the no confidence vote.

Russell, Dean (Supporter)
Watford MP who would comfortably lose his Watford seat to Labour based on the current levels of Conservative polling. Speaking to the Watford Observer he welcomed the changes that the PM has made at Downing Street and said that he will now wait for the full details of the Met investigation.

Rutley, David (Supporter)
Junior minister and Cheshire MP.  Is quoted on Cheshire Live as saying, Boris Johnson has taken ‘full responsibility’ for the No 10 party and said he was right to apologise. Confirmed on Twitter that he had supported the PM in the vote of no confidence.

Scully, Paul (Supporter)
Brexiter business minister who has defended Boris on the airwaves, often through some challenging interviews.   Result in his Sutton and Cheam seat would be on a knife edge with the Lib Dems at the current levels of polling. Confirmed he was backing the PM on Twitter on the day of the no confidence vote.

Seeley, Bob (Supporter)
Isle of Wight MP. Has said that the PM has apologised and hoped that he will learn lessons.   Ahead of a Commons vote in April about referring the PM to a commons committee, he appeared to be taking a more questioning line when speaking on the BBC Radio 4’s ‘World at One’. He said, ‘Genuinely I don’t know how I am going to vote”, adding, “It’s quite clear that if Number Ten staff didn’t think they were risking death by having an end of work drinks.  Announced he supported the PM in the no confidence vote in part because of a generous funding programme announced for the Isle of Wight.

Sharma, Alok (Supporter)
Cabinet minister, who backed Boris in the 2019 leadership election.  Has said the PM was ‘right to apologise’.  Would comfortably lose his Reading West seat to Labour under current polling.

Shapps, Grant (Supporter)
Transport secretary who has been active defending the PM on the airwaves in the last month. The result in his Welwyn Hatfield constituency would be on an absolute knife edge at this level of polling.

Shelbrooke, Alex (Supporter)
 Independent minded MP from Elmet in Yorkshire who has been ferociously critical of the government in the Commons about the delay in housing Ukrainian refugees. Mr Shelbrooke has also said, that he ‘won’t defend the indefensible’ and that he had told this to Mr Johnson’s face. He also added that he had knocked on a very large number of doors since January and so knew how angry people were in relation to ‘partygate’.  Stated that he supported the PM in the leadership vote again referencing Ukraine.  Particularly straight talking Yorkshire MP so we are taking his support at full face value.

Smith, Chloe (Supporter)
Junior minister, who supported Johnson in the 2019 leadership election.  In a statement on her website she has said, “The prime minister continues to have my support”. Reaffirmed this support on Twitter after the police issued their fines, and said she had nothing ‘further to add’ after the Gray report was published. Would comfortably lose her Norwich North seat to Labour based on the current levels of Conservative polling.

Smith, Royston (Supporter)
Brexiter who backed Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 Conservative leadership election. Would comfortably lose his Southampton Itchen seat to Labour based on the current levels of Conservative polling.  Has previously expressed interest in who is behind all the government leaks.  Although waiting for the findings of the various inquiries, appears to be giving some support to the PM, having been quoted in the Southern Daily Echo as saying, “The prime minister needs to explain what he knows, apologise if necessary and move on. I think most people would have understood that”. After the Gray Report was published, Mr Smith admitted rules were broken but refused to criticise the Prime Minister’s leadership.  

Solloway, Amanda (Supporter)
Government whip. Would comfortably lose her Derby North seat to Labour based on the current levels of Conservative polling. Has welcomed the PM’s apology, telling Derbyshire Live that, “Under our prime minister, our government has delivered on Brexit and a tremendous vaccine rollout and continues to focus on delivering the fastest growing economy in G7 despite the pandemic”. The day after the fixed penalty notice was issued, detailed on Twitter that the PM still had her support ‘getting on with the job’. Confirmed the same on the day of the no confidence vote.

Spencer, Mark (Supporter)
Former government chief whip and now leader of the House of Commons.  Johnson ally.

Stafford, Alexander (Supporter)
Brexiter and Red Wall MP elected in 2019. Would comfortably lose his Rother Valley seat to Labour based on the current levels of Conservative polling. Has publicly said that Keir Starmer should be investigated for drinking beer in a previous lockdown saying, “Those in glass houses should not throw beer bottles”. He has also tweeted in support of the PM saying, “On Monday the prime minister promised to radically reform how number 10 operates. It is clear that today he is keeping his word by having a wholesale clear-out, to create a better more dynamic operation”. Stafford also supported the PM in a the Commons debate on 21st April.  Backed him on TV on the day of the vote.

Stephenson, Andrew (Supporter)
Transport minister who backed Boris in the 2019 leadership election.  Would lose his Pendle seat to Labour based on the current levels of Conservative polling.  Does not appear to have commented publicly on the PM’s future, but tweeted to describe the February appointment of Steve Barclay to head up the No.10 operation as an ‘excellent choice’. Tweeted his support on the day of the no confidence vote.

Stevenson, Jane (Supporter)
Red wall MP elected in 2019, but who would lose her Wolverhampton North East seat to Labour in any general election that reflected the current opinion polls. Did not appear to have commented publicly on the PM’s future, but tweeted to say she had supported him in the no confidence vote, albeit she had ‘thought long and hard about it’.

Stewart, Iain (Supporter)
Junior Scottish Office minister who backed Michael Gove in the 2019 Conservative leadership election.  Would lose his Milton Keynes South seat to Labour in any General election based on the current levels of opinion polls. Does not appear to have commented publicly on the PM’s future, but did retweet something welcoming the appointment of Guto Harri as the PMs new spin doctor. In February, he also told the Scotsman newspaper that it was nonsense that the PM was not welcome in Scotland. Confirmed his backing for the PM on the day of the no confidence vote.

Stewart, Bob (Supporter)
Former high profile army Colonel who has been the MP for Beckenham since 2010.  Backed Boris in the 2019 conservative leadership election.  Has said he ‘abhors’ the lockdown parities but told LBC that he will remain loyal to Boris adding if anyone ‘can turn a situation around, he can, and he’s proved that in the past’.

Stuart, Graham (Supporter)
Left the government in 2021 after three years as a junior minister.  Supported Johnson in the 2019 conservative leadership election. Has been seen to retweet messages from other MPs that backed the PM.  On 31st Jan wrote, “Boris was elected to do a job. He must be allowed to get on with it.”

Sunderland, James (Supporter)
Former army corporal first elected in 2019 for the safe seat of Bracknell in Berkshire.  He was quoted in January in the Guardian as saying that he was “furious” at the apparent lack of grip relating to the situation, adding, something has “clearly gone wrong with the political machine at No 10.”  Confirmed to BBC Five Live that he was ‘likely’ to be voting for Boris Johnson.  Likely is not a total endorsement that said.

Sunak, Rishi (Supporter)
Chancellor of the Exchequer, and before his own police fine, previously considered the person most likely to take over if Boris departs.  Publicly stated his total support for the prime minister. Has taken a ‘big hit’ recently in popularity, and his political fortunes now appear more closely tied to that of the prime minister.

Swayne, Desmond (Supporter)
Veteran MP and lockdown sceptic from the New Forest.  He sits on the right of the Conservative party and is an arch lockdown sceptic.   Has previously detailed his “extreme concern” over “this very sorry state of affairs”. However after Johnson announced all covid restricitons would soon end, he appeared more positive. Speaking on 10th February, he said he was personally clear that the PM ‘was not a liar’ and that he did not accept the rather dodgy premise that Johnson is ‘limping along’. After photos of one gathering party emerged in May, Swayne appeared to back the PM on Newsnight saying, “It was a work do, that’s what people do at work. You have leaving dos”.  Confirmed that he had backed the PM in the no confidence vote.

Throup, Maggie (Supporter)
Supported Matt Hancock in the 2019 leadership contest.  Vaccines minister who struggled with a hostile audience on the BBC’s Question Time when defending the government in December. Recently has only commented on the need to wait for the outcome of the Gray report.  Result in her Erewash constituency would be on an absolute knife edge at current opinion poll levels. Tweeted her support for the PM on the day of the no confidence vote.

Tomlinson, Justin (Supporter)
Deputy chairman of the Conservative party.  Backed Boris in the 2019 leadership contest.  Has praised the PM’s right calls on all the big judgements in the pandemic and has said, ‘We need to move on’.

Trevelyan, Anne-Marie (Supporter)
Cabinet minister from Northumberland who has supported the PM on the airwaves.  Backed Boris in the 2019 leadership contest.  Johnson ally.

Truss, Liz (Supporter)
Foreign secretary who has been promoted by Johnson, and has been publicly backing her boss on the airwaves.   Has tweeted that, “I stand behind the Prime minister, 100% as he takes our country forward”. Touted by some as a potential successor if Johnson resigns.

Vara, Shailesh (Supporter)
Resigned from the Theresa May government over Brexit.  Backed Boris in the 2019 leadership election. After the Gray report, told his local Peterborough News, that, “There is no vacancy and both prime minister and I recognise that there are other issues that affect North-West Cambridgeshire and the rest of this country.”

Vickers, Martin (Supporter)
Brexiter who backed Boris in the 2019 leadership election.   He told the Observer that he despaired at the ‘management structure’ in Downing Street such that the events under investigation could have occurred.  He has also claimed that the PM should have left the Downing Street garden in May 2020 as soon as he arrived. He has though also claimed this is not the right time for a leadership election. After the publication of the Gray Report he told Grimsby Live, “The important thing to do now is to put it behind us and we should get on with the job. We cannot have a six-week vacuum while the party looked for a new leader when there are vital matters to tackle such as the cost-of-living and wars going on. We live in a democracy and people will have their opportunity to pass their verdict at election time.”

Webb, Suzanne (Supporter)
Midlands MP for Stourbridge, elected in 2019.  Said in the Commons, after the Gray Report, that, “Those opposite, have used up far too much parliamentary time debating this. After the PM was issued with a fine, told her local ‘Express and Star’ that it was right the PM ‘apologised’ but that the PM was rightly focussed on global leadership following the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Speaking after the Gray Report was published she told the same paper, “The report has concluded that the Prime Minister attended nearly all the gatherings right at the start before quickly leaving. What happened afterwards he neither knew nothing about nor had organised. She added, “It has also concluded he knew nothing in advance about his surprise birthday party and I remain surprised he was fined for it”. Confirmed she would be voting for the PM on the day of the no confidence vote.

Warman, Matt (Supporter)
Former Daily Telegraph journalist who backed Boris in the 2019 leadership election.  Left the government in 2021. Following the Gray report, told Lincolnshire live, that, “I welcome the prime minister’s heartfelt, sincere apology and look forward to the government doing what it was elected to do and getting on with delivering on the people’s priorities.” On the day the PM received a fine for his birthday gathering, Warman appeared on Radio 4 to offer him his support. Confirmed on Twitter he would support him in the no confidence vote.

Wallace, Ben (Supporter)
Defence Secretary. Publicly backing the PM and has defended him on the airwaves.  Backed Johnson in the 2019 contest, and considered a long time ally of Boris. Now being seriously considered as potential replacement candidate should Boris fall.

Wheeler, Heather (Supporter)
Supported Boris in the 2019 leadership contest. Reported in Derbyshire Live saying, “The Prime minister has my support” and that she abhorred this “whipped up campaign against him.”  Unsurprisingly was thus promoted in the latest February 2022 reshuffle to become parliamentary secretary in the Cabinet office. Backed the PM on Twitter on the day of the no confidence vote.

Whately, Helen (Supporter)
Media savvy ambitious junior minister at the treasury under Rishi Sunak.  Kent MP who backed Jeremy Hunt in the 2019 leadership campaign.  Initially made little notable public comment on partygate, but when her boss Rishi Sunak and the PM were issued police fines, she joined other ministers on Twitter to confirm that both still enjoyed her support. On Twitter, she stated that she would vote for the PM on the day of the no confidence vote.

Whittingdale, John (Supporter)
Veteran MP and former cabinet minister who left a further stint in government in 2021.  Backed Boris in the 2019 leadership election.  Whilst saying that he understands the anger of his constituents, he is quoted in his local Braintree and Witham Times as saying he does have confidence in the PM, adding, “He has done many things that he set out to do very successfully and his Government deserves credit for delivering Brexit, rolling out the most successful vaccine programme in the world and supporting the UK economy to become the fastest growing in the G7”.  The Prime minister’s wife, Carrie, also previously worked for Mr Whittingdale for 15 months.

Williams, Craig (Supporter)
Elected in 2019 for a relatively safe seat in rural Wales.  Issued a statement on partygate in which he said, “I welcome the full apology from the prime minister and more importantly his commitment to fixing the system by which Number 10 is managed”.  He added, “I share in the deep frustrations felt by many, and I recognise that much needs to be done by Number 10 to rebuild trust with the public. This is a first step in the right direction”. On the day Boris and Rishi Sunak received a police fine, he tweeted that he ‘would continue to fully support them both in the important work that they are doing’. Confirmed on twitter that he would vote for the PM on the day of the vote of no confidence.

Wiggin, Bill (Supporter)
Long standing MP from Herefordshire.  Backed Boris in the 2019 contest. At the start of February 2022, he told Talk Radio that he didn’t feel the time had yet been reached to change leader, and that, “My view is that Boris is doing what he is supposed to do”. He reiterate his support to the Hereford Times after the publication of the Gray report, and again on the day of the no confidence vote.

Wild, James (Supporter)
Elected in 2019. Has publicly commented that he is not calling on the PM to quit at this stage. Married to Baroness Evans who sits in the Johnson cabinet as leader of the House of Lords  Confirmed on Twitter that he had voted for the PM.

Wood, Mike (Supporter)
Midlands MP who backed Boris in the later part of the 2019 leadership election and is a government PPS.  Previously suggested that the Gray report would need to show that the PM took clear and deliberate actions to mislead Parliament for anything to ‘fundamentally’ change for Mr Johnson. Told the Birmingham Mail in April that he does not intend to submit a letter of no confidence. After the publication of the Gray report he told the Telegraph that there ‘was not much new’ in the report.

Young, Jacob (Supporter)
Red Wall MP elected for Redcar in 2019.  Would comfortably lose his seat to Labour in any election that reflected currently opinion poll levels. He remains a Boris loyalist though, having told Teeside Live that, “The prime minister has apologised unreservedly, has outlined how he will act, and I believe now is the time to move on”. Backed the PM on Twitter on day of no confidence vote.

Zahawi, Nadhim (Supporter)
Education Secretary.  Johnson ally. Publicly backing the PM, and has defended him on the airwaves. Emerging as a potential candidate to replace the PM.

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MPs not eligible to vote

The following two MPs were elected as Conservatives in the 2019 General election, but have since lost the Conservative party whip at Westminster.  They are thus not eligible to vote in any leadership election:

Roberts, Rob [Couldn’t vote]
Elected as the Conservative MP for Delyn in North Wales in 2019, but was suspended from the Commons for six weeks in 2021.  He was readmitted to the Conservative party in late 2021, but does not yet have the Conservative whip.  He sits as an Independent at Westminster.

Warburton, David [Couldn’t vote]
Ring tone entrepreneur who represents Somerton and Frome.  He was suspended from the parliamentary party following a series of newspaper revelations in March 2022. Without the conservative whip, he will not be able to vote in any leadership content. He supported Boris in the 2019 conservative leadership election, but should he have been able to vote, it was not clear that it would have supported the PM. He detailed on Twitter how his father died almost entirely alone during the first lockdown, how this was followed by just ‘3 of us’ being able to attend an outside burial that passed for his funeral, and how all this was a week before the first reported Downing Street party.  Continuing he said that ‘to understand the distress these revelations have caused is an understatement’, adding, “Like millions of others, I want to know the full extent of this troubling interpretation of the rules.  And what is to be done.”

In addition to the above, Christian Wakeford MP has since crossed the floor of the House of Commons and joined the Labour Party. Following his court conviction, Imran Ahmad Khan has also resigned from Westminster creating a by-election in his Wakefield seat. Neil Parish has also stood down as an MP following allegations that he watched pornography in the Commons chamber.

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***Politics.co.uk note – Should any Conservative MP reading this, not be happy with our current assessment of their position, they are of course welcome to contact us.***