Cameron offers ‘contract’ to British people

By politics.co.uk staff

The Conservatives are launching a nationwide literature campaign offering a ‘contract’ between David Cameron and voters.

Its leaflet, which will be distributed across the country in the final week of the general election campaign, clearly tells voters they should reject a Tory government if it does not fulfil its pledges.

It comes as the Tory leader begins to focus on seats, like former Labour MP Tony Wright’s Cannock Chase constituency, which are much higher up the Tory target list.

“For too long, you’ve been lied to by politicians saying that they can sort out all your problems. But it doesn’t work like that,” Mr Cameron writes in a personal message on the leaflet.

“This is our contract with you. I want you to read it and – if we win the election – use it to hold us to account. If we don’t deliver our side of the bargain, vote us out in five years’ time.”

The leaflet seeks to address other parties’ criticisms about the risk of Tory cuts, which have been based on the lack of commitment to preserve services like free eye tests and prescriptions for pensioners.

Mr Cameron’s contract says this will be protected, as will pensions, pension credit, the winter fuel allowance and free bus passes for pensioners and disabled people.

Labour’s head of election strategy Peter Mandelson called the contract a “Tory con trick”.

“With days to go it’s vital that voters take a close look at the small print behind the Tories’ PR,” he said.

“David Cameron is trying to sell people something without revealing that his plans mean cuts to tax credits, cuts to Child Trust Funds, cuts to schools, cuts for manufacturing, and cuts to the police.

“David Cameron might think he can fool the voters with a glossy leaflet but he should give them more credit than that.”

The ‘contract’ follows the final televised leaders’ debate, which according to most snap polls was won by Mr Cameron.

Bookmakers quickly cut the odds of a Tory victory afterwards. William Hill reduced the odds of a Conservative majority from 6/4 to 5/4.