Poll: Councils' anti-social behaviour funding backed

Councils claim overwhelming public support for their tackling of anti-social behaviour
Councils claim overwhelming public support for their tackling of anti-social behaviour

By politics.co.uk staff

The funding local government spends on tackling anti-social behaviour should be protected, a poll has indicated.

The ComRes poll for the Local Government Association (LGA) suggested overwhelming support for councils' self-professed "triumph" in dealing with low-level disturbances.

According to the survey, 77% of people agreed that funding for the councils' strategies ought to be protected.


Mehboob Khan, chair of the LGA's safer and stronger communities programme board, which meets today in Brighton, highlighted the support for anti-social behaviour schemes in operation.

"Councils are working extremely hard in partnership with the police and other agencies to help bring down the levels of anti-social behaviour and ensure a safer environment for everyone," he said.

"There are some fantastic innovative schemes taking place across the country and today's conference provides a platform for councils to share experiences and take forward new ideas in our fight against crime.

"Local authorities have come a long way in understanding what works to deal with anti-social behaviour, so to have the public's reassurance that we are aiming in the right direction is very encouraging."

The LGA will use the figures as a last-minute plea to spare local government from the brunt of the spending review.

Eric Pickles, the local government secretary, has enthusiastically trimmed many areas of his department's budget - so much so that he is allowed to sit on the 'star chamber' finalising the spending review.

The chancellor will reveal the details of that process on October 20th.

Analysts anticipate dramatic cuts and an equally large backlash from the public as the 'age of austerity' makes the transition from abstract ideas to political reality.

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