Concerns at life-long pupil database

A life-long database tracking the progress of every school child is set to be created by the government.

Exam results of every 14-year-old are set to be logged on a nationwide database known as Managing Information Across Partners (MIAP), allowing universities and employers to check applicants’ qualifications at any point in the future.

Under the proposals, yet to be formally unveiled, all 14-year-olds will be issued with a unique learner number.

Unlike the unique pupil number which this replaces, it will not be cancelled when a student leaves school, creating fears of ‘big brother’ government.

The proposal has been criticised by education professionals and there are concerns records of expulsions and exclusions could be inappropriately used against people in later life.

Referencing last year’s high-profile data losses, John Dunford, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders said: “Given the track record of government IT disasters and the possibility that all these children’s records will end up in Iowa, this is a worry.”

But Chris Banks, chairman of the Learning and Skills Council (LSC) which is involved in MIAP, said: “The overall aim is to help a person keep track of their skills, achievements and qualifications made in school, at college, in the workplace and throughout their lives.”

A life-long database tracking the progress of every school child is set to be created by the government.

Exam results of every 14-year-old are set to be logged on a nationwide database known as Managing Information Across Partners (MIAP), allowing universities and employers to check applicants’ qualifications at any point in the future.

Under the proposals, yet to be formally unveiled, all 14-year-olds will be issued with a unique learner number.

Unlike the unique pupil number which this replaces, it will not be cancelled when a student leaves school, creating fears of ‘big brother’ government.

The proposal has been criticised by education professionals and there are concerns records of expulsions and exclusions could be inappropriately used against people in later life.

Referencing last year’s high-profile data losses, John Dunford, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders said: “Given the track record of government IT disasters and the possibility that all these children’s records will end up in Iowa, this is a worry.”

But Chris Banks, chairman of the Learning and Skills Council (LSC) which is involved in MIAP, said: “The overall aim is to help a person keep track of their skills, achievements and qualifications made in school, at college, in the workplace and throughout their lives.”