The end of feminism?

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Women in the armed forces receive a briefing. Many younger women struggle to believe their predecessors' were not given equal rights at work.
Women in the armed forces recieve a briefing. Many yoounger women struggle to believe their predessesors were not given equal rights at work.

Just one in seven women would call themselves a feminist, a new survey found today.

The Netmum's poll found one in three women thought feminism was "too aggressive" towards men, while one in five believed it was "old-fashioned".

Tellingly, the survey showed Harry Potter author JK Rowling was seen as a better role model than Germaine Greer, author of the Female Eunuch, who won  just one in 50 votes.

The results suggest most women believe the struggle for equality has already been achieved, despite clear evidence of systemic differences between male and female pay and a continued difficulty for women to reach senior positions in the professions.


Younger women were even less likely to identify with feminism. Just one in ten women aged 25 to 29 identified with the term, compared to a quarter of those aged 45 to 50.

But younger women still raised concerns about the number of roles they were expected to fulfil. Seventy per cent said they were under pressure to be "red-hot lovers, domestic goddesses, climb the career ladder and look like supermodels".

The report comes a day after US presidential hopeful Mitt Romney was mercilessly mocked online for saying his aides would bring him "binders full of women" for senior positions. 

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